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Yet not a single interview

 
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I passed my OCJP certification in March and i am applying for the Java Programmer/Developer since last 2 or 3 months.Yet i haven`t get any interview call .
I passed my certification with 93% and i`think i`m quite good at it.

I know passing OCJP doesn`t assure a job but i think it should give a chance of interview at least.

The other thing that is not very good is ,that most of the openings in Java demands the experience of 2-5 years.
Very few openings for Java Freashers .I cleared my b.tech(CS) just last month.

Any tips and suggesstions ...
 
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Try talking to your on campus recruiting department. They may have listings of companies willing to hire entry level candidates.

Also, try making your resume more impressive. A lot of people have a degree and internship or some sort of other experience. Have you done anything? Built a website for fun? Answered questions on an online forum? Try to find something that shows you can apply the skills you've learned.
 
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I have blogged about handy career making tips and 400+ Java Job Interview Questions and Answers with useful tutorials..
 
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Hello Mahtab,

i'm in a situation similar to yours. I think that creating something that you like and posting on the web could be a nice "add on" on your job search.
I'm still studying, so i don't feel exactly ready for a job, so my point is to get certified and say "hey i'm pretty good in java!". But while studying i'm trying to create some little applications (videogames, that i love), i'm going to post this on the web, so interviewers will have the possibility to see my abilities in practice (or so i hope).
However...

good luck! (we are all on the same boat) :-)
 
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Mahtab Alam wrote:The other thing that is not very good is ,that most of the openings in Java demands the experience of 2-5 years.
Very few openings for Java Freashers .I cleared my b.tech(CS) just last month.

Any tips and suggesstions ...


Mahtab,
As someone who's been on both sides of the hiring equation, I can tell you that making your resume readable is a key point. Don't assume the people reading it are technical - most Human Resource folks aren't, so spell out things like Oracle Java Certified Programmer.

Generally the reason a company requires experience is so they have some proof that you know what you're doing. One way to give them proof is by joining an open source project that's interesting to you and contributing to it. If you have bug fixes or enhancements posted then people can see the quality of your work -- which should mitigate their concerns and reduce the need for experience. If the project is for a developer tool or library that the company you're interviewing with actually uses then so much the better since you're already contributing to their benefit.

All that being said, one of the best ways I know to get hired is to meet the managers who are looking for developers, and a great way to do that is to attend and contribute to User Group meetings. If there's a nearby Java User Group, start attending and talk to the people there - not just about looking for a job, but cool things you're doing or have recently read about. Ask questions. Hiring managers love finding passionate developers because they know you're not just punching a clock to get paid. After they get to know you, you'll probably find some of them asking where you're working and if you'd consider changing companies. It's a good feeling when that happens.

Good luck with the search,
Burk
 
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