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atvamshi krishna
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Hi,

I am new to this site. I need some support from you guys reg. learning Java.
I am in to Software field for 6 years and I am from CS back ground. I work on automation testing i.e, all of my experience in automation.
I was a programmer who use to program with heart not for just anything. Due to some reasons I had never got a chance to be developer.

Now I feel I miss everything...my coding...being in automation testing made me an expert but never Satisfied me.

When I was doing my Engineering I love this programming languages..Java was one among them. Because of my heart towards that language I still
remember 60% of Java i have done in my Engineering.

Can any of you guys help me Or Suggest me how to move in my life.

Best Regards,
Vamshi
 
Jim Venolia
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Not exactly sure what you're asking, so here's my story.

In '78 I bought a TRS-80 because I was tired of pumping quarters into video games. I was soon writing programs in Basic. I found Conway's game of Life and coded it up. Couldn't make it run. One time while it was running I went to make lunch, came back and saw the screen had updated. It was running, it was just slow.

So I started learning Z-80 assembly. At the time I was an electronic tech, testing boards that came in and fixing those that didn't work. The system had an 8080, which was essentially a crippled Z80. I started writing assembly code to help me find problems. I wrote the code by hand, and converted the assembly to machine language by hand, then used a built in memory modify routine to poke the code into memory.

One day a guy in engineering stopped in and saw me running my code. He was all like "Whisky Tango Foxtrot?". I explained, and within a month I was a Jr Engineer, writing 8086 assembly. From there I learned microcode (google bitslice 2900), then C, then the whole world opened up.

I guess my advice is to learn Java and look for entry level Java jobs.

I've written a lot of automated test software. Most of it has been test harnesses for my code (Python is great for this), but I've also been responsible for testing cell phone base station software (used perl, had a team of 6 under me), and verify functionality of new chips for Qualcomm (used Perl to download and run a series of tests written in C, perl also evaluated the results).

(an hour or so later). LOL. Googling for something else I found this, which is the machine I punched that 8080 code into. My launchpad. They were about $10-15k back in the day.


 
Winston Gutkowski
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atvamshi krishna wrote:Can any of you guys help me Or Suggest me how to move in my life.

Well, I don't know about life advice, but I would definitely recommend that you read THIS.

And if Java rocks your boat, I can also heartily recommend this book.

HIH

Winston
 
Chan Ag
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If you like it so much, get started with it. Install JDK on your laptop, if you haven't already done that. Setup the environment variable/variables and get it working. I don't know if your automation testing job requires you to program in Java and hence if you're already adept at those basic things. Ignore this suggestion if you're past that stage already -- I'm not aware of how much out of touch you are with programming in Java.

You must already know what works best for you - books/Oracle tutorials/Coderanch''s Campfire stories kind of things. Choose any of those things. It doesn't really matter. After you've read something, code it and see how it works. Try the same program with small variations and see the difference it makes to the output. If you like to make notes, make your own notes. I mean there is no one way of learning. It only matters till you haven't started. Once you get started, the rest of the things start to fall in place. With time you will be able to figure what to concentrate more on, what to ignore, and what to park aside for laters.

Fortunately the Java community I know is very helpful and supportive. So that is a big plus.
 
atvamshi krishna
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Thank you Guys...Thank you Very much for your Advise. I know what to do know. Thanks Again.

Best Regards
Vamshi
 
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