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My final questions

 
Edward Nunez
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Howdy. I've been studying for this exam for quite some time now and I believe I'm pretty close to ready. I just wanted to see if I could get some clarification.

I primarily read through Gupta's certification guide to get a feel for what's on the test. Then I studied the practice problems in Finegan, Herrera, and Deshmukh's books. All fine books in their own right but I found they cover quite a few things Gupta said would not be on the test. Moreover, at least one of these books didn't present its practice exam in the format Gupta said it would be in. So I'm wondering, how right is Gupta on the issue of what's on the test? Does each question tell you the number of right options?

You see, I think I'm ready but the discrepancies in the books I've looked at make me nervous. Do you guys know of any cheap, accurate practice exams I can take to really let me know where I'm at? This is all that stands between me and the test center at this point.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Ted,
The Amazon review of Herrera says "Questions are really tough, and should be used before going trough. any mock exams to "warm up", although there are are topics not covered by the exam."

I reviewed the software version of the Deshmukh one and wrote "It was more difficult than the exam, but not overwhelmingly so. The only topic that stood out as being on the mock and not needing to know was the ranges that primitive objects could hold. " My scores were 78%, 82%, 82%, 83%, 80% and 88% on the software version exams corresponding to the book and a 98% on the actual exam.

I recall there only being one correct answer per question, but could be remembering this wrong. All the Oracle exams either have one correct answer or tell you how many are correct though. So don't worry about that. I knew the McGraw-Hill book for the OCPJP does have multiple correct answers without telling you how many are correct. This is done to make them harder so you are ready for the real exam. I wouldn't be surprised if one of the OCAJP books does the same.

Can you give some examples of things you saw in the books that weren't in Gupta's book. It would be easier to say "yes, that's on the exam" or "no, don't worry about that" for concrete examples. You can see I did that in my review of Deshmukh.

As a bit of history, the old programmer exam was split into two - OCAJP and OCPJP. Gupta wrote her book from scratch for the new exam. Finegan's looks adapted from another exam that no longer exists. Deshmukh's is from a company that did questions for the old exam that covered the now split exams. My point here is that it is VERY easy for a concept to slip into a question unnoticed.

Even if you feel ready, it would be good to post the topics you weren't sure if were in scope. (I'll even bribe you with a cow for taking the time to do that.) Regardless, good luck on the exam!
 
Roel De Nijs
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Ted Nunez wrote:So I'm wondering, how right is Gupta on the issue of what's on the test?

As far as I know the Mala Gupta book is a very good study guide for this certification. You'll find the exam topics here.

Ted Nunez wrote:Does each question tell you the number of right options?

On the exam you'll know for each question how many answers you have to select.

Ted Nunez wrote:Do you guys know of any cheap, accurate practice exams I can take to really let me know where I'm at? This is all that stands between me and the test center at this point.

The Enthuware mock questions are quite popular and very cheap. So I would try that one.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Roel De Nijs wrote:The Enthuware mock questions are quite popular and very cheap. So I would try that one.

My understanding is that the Deshmukh book is pretty much the Enthuware mocks in book form.
 
Edward Nunez
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Ted,
The Amazon review of Herrera says "Questions are really tough, and should be used before going trough. any mock exams to "warm up", although there are are topics not covered by the exam."

I reviewed the software version of the Deshmukh one and wrote "It was more difficult than the exam, but not overwhelmingly so. The only topic that stood out as being on the mock and not needing to know was the ranges that primitive objects could hold. " My scores were 78%, 82%, 82%, 83%, 80% and 88% on the software version exams corresponding to the book and a 98% on the actual exam.

I recall there only being one correct answer per question, but could be remembering this wrong. All the Oracle exams either have one correct answer or tell you how many are correct though. So don't worry about that. I knew the McGraw-Hill book for the OCPJP does have multiple correct answers without telling you how many are correct. This is done to make them harder so you are ready for the real exam. I wouldn't be surprised if one of the OCAJP books does the same.

Can you give some examples of things you saw in the books that weren't in Gupta's book. It would be easier to say "yes, that's on the exam" or "no, don't worry about that" for concrete examples. You can see I did that in my review of Deshmukh.

As a bit of history, the old programmer exam was split into two - OCAJP and OCPJP. Gupta wrote her book from scratch for the new exam. Finegan's looks adapted from another exam that no longer exists. Deshmukh's is from a company that did questions for the old exam that covered the now split exams. My point here is that it is VERY easy for a concept to slip into a question unnoticed.

Even if you feel ready, it would be good to post the topics you weren't sure if were in scope. (I'll even bribe you with a cow for taking the time to do that.) Regardless, good luck on the exam!



You wrote the foreword to Gupta's book, didn't you? Nice to meet you.

Some of the topics I saw in other books that I probably should not have seen include wrapper classes, enumerations, and various methods (ArrayList, StringBuilder, etc. classes) and Exceptions that I hadn't seen yet. What I'd like is one test that truly looks and feels like the actual test to know where I'm at instead of a bunch of tests that are purposely harder to in order to prepare me. I noticed that Oracle has links to "official" mock exams by Kaplan and Transcender. A bit pricy ($60-$70) but if that's what I have than it's much better than retaking the actual test.

 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Ted Nunez wrote:You wrote the foreword to Gupta's book, didn't you? Nice to meet you.

Yes, that's me. Which means I know for sure that Gupta's book doesn't contain out of scope concepts .

Ted Nunez wrote:Some of the topics I saw in other books that I probably should not have seen include wrapper classes, enumerations, and various methods (ArrayList, StringBuilder, etc. classes) and Exceptions that I hadn't seen yet.

While the basics of ArrayList and StringBuilder are on the exam, they won't ask you about the more obscure methods. Wrapper classes and enumerations aren't on the exam at all. I really think it is a case of questions from the old exam slipping in there.

Ted Nunez wrote:I noticed that Oracle has links to "official" mock exams by Kaplan and Transcender. A bit pricy ($60-$70) but if that's what I have than it's much better than retaking the actual test.

I don't think it is worth the money to buy those. The odds of you passing the real exam on the first try are quite high. Also, remember that you don't need to get 100% on the exam. It's ok to not know a couple things.
 
Edward Nunez
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Passed with flying colors. Thanks for the extra boost of confidence Jeanne. Now on to Programmer II.
 
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