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problem in new job

 
Greenhorn
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Hi Ranches,
This is ram ,i had 3+ years of experience in Java, SOA, and BPM Technologies, two months before I started a new career in one well reputed product based company they requited me for BPM Technology . but they assigned tasks on other technology(java script framework),i am very new to that technology so i complete the task on little bit slow,so they not satisfied with my performance They told there is no too much of work in BPM or SOA or Java in that project.so they told to me if my performance is same level means they will fire out in 6 months(probationary period ).Technically i am enough sound in Oracle SOA and BPM Technology .before join i have multiple offers in some well known service based company .now i think i taken very worst decision

now i need to think about only two ways..


1.Start Search job in my desired technology, at the time of interview not show this 2 month experience

2.Stay there up to 6 months if things goes well means continue. Or search job after they take decision ,.but its is very bad mark in my resume

please guide me what is correct way for me at this point of time

Thanks,

 
Bartender
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So you got hired to work on BPM technology yet you got assigned to do javascript?

Anyway first you should understand the company's view. Are there currently any BPM/SOA/Java projects going on now? If so will the company allow you to get involve given where the project's life cycle is? Are there any new BPM projects not started yet maybe still in the negotiation phase? Is the company planned for you to involve in these new projects? Do the company expect your role to also know web client technologies (HTML/Javascript/CSS)?

Based on what you find in the above, and you still decide to leave ... start looking straight away. Don't have to wait to end of probation period to leave if you do have offer. This way you can exclude your current employer from CV if timing is right.
 
Ranch Hand
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It could be that in the new position that you might get, you could end up in the same situation. In my point of view an ideal solution to this would be to compromise yourself and focus on the technology stack what your current employer expects, gain good working knowledge and show to your employer that you have taken up the challenge and met their expectations. I see this as an opportunity offered to you to work on a certain technology / tool that you have little or no experience.
 
author & internet detective
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I agree with Joe. Take it as an opportunity to develop skills in JavaScript. In the long run, it isn't good to be overspecialized. This also makes you more valuable to your next employer because they can put you on a project with 75% BPM work and 25% JavaScript work. If the problem is being slow to lack of familiarity, practice at home.

As far as your resume goes, it is ok to mention a short term job. Maybe you were a contractor. Maybe the project ended. There can be any number of reasons. The problem isn't when one job is short. The problem is when a resume/CV has a lot of short term jobs. It makes the person look like he/she will leave or be fired.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you will have a 2 month gap if you go with option 1. Probably 3-4+ by the time you get hired somewhere else. Employers don't like big gaps on the resume/CV either.
 
Bartender
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Hi Ram,

Welcome to CodeRanch!

Tsang, Joe and Jeanne have already given nice advice.

Further to that, I would suggest to talk with your boss and let him/her know the reason behind why you were slow. It might be possible that he/she is not aware about your lack of experience - and you should not take it granted (that he/she is aware of this fact).
The best way to tackle situation(s) like this is - to give specific data (why you took more time for this project) and ask specific questions (which area should be improved, what are the expectations, where you are lacking, what can be done to make things better etc.).

Once you make them feel that you really want to improve - which will be beneficial for everybody in long term - probably their attitude will change. And of course, as mentioned above, you'll come to know the areas of improvement.

I hope this helps.

All the Best!
 
Bartender
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Do you like working in javascript? If yes, use the 6 months to enhance your knowledge and skill set. If not start looking for a job. At the end of the day, what matters, is you do what you really enjoy doing and don't take up any job just because its "IT"
Also please don't take this wrong, but if I were you, I would also work on improving my language skills. Nowadays with the "global village" phenomenon you will need to work with a variety of people from different countries and cultures. So communication is a key skill to have
 
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