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please help clear the clutter i'm new to programming  RSS feed

 
Donald Gooden
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hey guys and any gals i am new to programming i am new to java i have been wasting away in a warehouse environment and decided on a career change. there is a program in Memphis that offers a 7 week program in java and guarantees a job as a software developer if you pass. i would like to join this program next year, so my question is can i learn java,c++,c# programming in a year? i'm having trouble of where i should start. here is a list of all my books that i have to start with, i would like to know the communities experience with them.

Ivor Horton a beginning java

Herbert Schildt beginners guide

effective java

thinking in java

c++ from the ground up

c++ the complete reference

java the complete reference

beginning visual c# programming

learning java

Ivor Horton beginning visual c++

code complete

c++ without fear

core java fundamental vol 1
as well as some android and game programming books. my ultimate goal is to work in the industry while i earn my masters in software engineering and since i'm 39 i'm trying to give myself a head start on my core studies ,please help clear the clutter
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Welcome to the Ranch

Take it easy until you start your course. You may find you won't understand the books until you start the course.
I know nothing about that course, but it is more likely to take 7 years than 7 weeks to learn computer science. I know you are impatient to get started, but consider a full‑blown BS/Bsc course in computer science.
We have book review pages ourselves. Some of those books are reviewed there. Two books I would warn you off; although they are very good, they are not intended for beginners:- Effective Java, Horstmann and Cornell (Core Java).

Doubtless other people will post, too. And doubtless they will have different opinions from mine. That's life!
 
Donald Gooden
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thanks sheriff but I won't start school till September and to get the job in Memphis I need to know Java and at least 1 or 2 other languages can you suggest an order for the books I have listed that I should follow? Was thinking beginners Java with I or and follow that with learning or beginning Java then thinking in Java core Java 1&2 then effective Java and last code complete and Java ranch to ask a bunch of noob questions:-) I plan on committing 8-10 hours a day studying to grasp the concepts and get to an advanced level by the end of the year
 
Bear Bibeault
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Head First Java is an often-recommended first book.

That said, be aware that you are not going to "learn Java" or any other language quickly. In fact, you will never "have learnt" it. I've been developing software for 35 years and I'm continually learning. The question is, at what point will you become competent. And that's something that's different for everyone.

I admire your drive. It will serve you well. But yeah, start with the basics, or you'll get quickly swamped and disillusioned.
 
Scott Winterbourne
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I agree with Bear. I started with "Head First Java" and it really helped me get a good foundation of programming and OOP concepts along with the Java language. I would highly recommend working along with the books examples. As you work through the book you keep building on code from the previous chapter to make an application that generates MIDI sounds and effects.

After you finish this book, I would recommend working on some of your own programming projects. Start slow and work your way up. That way you can work out design issues and get better at the basic before you build too much on top of them. You want to build good habbits from the beginning.

Also I would highly recommend joining a local or online Java User Group (JUG). There is an online one call vJug at Meetup.com that does weekly webinars on various topics. These will help to emerse you in java programming and you'll be able to learn by listening to the presentations, conversations, and participating in conversations.

Hope this helps a little.

Regards
 
Bear Bibeault
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Welcome to the Ranch, Scott.

Very helpful first post!
 
Donald Gooden
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thanks for all the great advice guys. I have looked at the HF book for Java but it dosent cover jdk7 that's why I got the other books for the jdk7 and beginner,intermediate and advanced coverage. I read the 10,000 hours article and understand the journey ahead of continual learning and embrace it fully. Right now I'm just striving for competency as I recall something i read stating knowing Java will make learning c++ and c# easier because of their similarities. Does anyone have any experience with the javaonline.org course?
 
Scott Winterbourne
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Thanks for the welcome Bear.

@Donald: Even though the HF book isn't specific to Java7, 95% or more of the material in the book is still relevant. All of the programming concepts it teaches you are persistant through Java 7 and will also through Java 8. Once you finish the book you can then look up specificly what was added in Java 7. From Java 6 to 7 was mostly adding some new libraries and features I believe.

There are a lot of syntax similarities between Java and C#. I learned basic Java first and then moved into C# a bit later. I did find it was easier to learn C# mostly because I already new how to "program". I was familier with control structures and data types and OOP concepts so all I had to focus on were the differences in the language itself. C# has a couple of different data types than Java but most are the same. Also C# has what's called "namespace" rather than Java packages. They are very similar with some slight differences.

I would say pick one language and focus on that one until you are very comfortable with it before moving to another language. Really focus on the programming and design concepts as those trasfer to any language. That will make picking up new languages much easier.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Scott Winterbourne wrote: . . . 95% or more of the material . . .
Surely you mean 100% or more

And welcome again.
 
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