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Need help in creating a user manager with java  RSS feed

 
Nanuim Ud
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Hi,

I've been given a project to create an automated documentation software.
That I have done but I need to also include a user manager for authorization and authentication
What framework do I use?
I'll really appreciate any ideas.

Thank you
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Such a task does not start with selecting the technologies used for implementation, it starts with gathering the detailed requirements followed by designing the proposed solution. From the design you should be able to infer which frameworks/technologies might or might not be useful.
 
Tim Holloway
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I'm not sure if moving this thread to "Servlets" gains anything on leaving it in "Tomcat", or any other web-related forum, but I'd like to offer some suggestions/observations

1. Document management systems already exist, and quite a few of them are in Java. Before inventing one from the ground up. I'd recommend looking at them. If you anticipate needs that the stock systems don't offer, look at the open-source document managers to see which ones might be easiest to customize.

2. A User Manager for Java webapps doesn't have to be in - or even in proximity to - Java. It's not uncommon for enterprise-level IT shops to maintain their user/authority system in something like Active Directory, where that information is being maintained by a separate security department using the Windows-based (non-Java) Active Directory tools.

One of the advantages of using the J2EE-standard container security framework is that the webapp doesn't have to persuade the app "purchaser"' to install Yet Another Security System. An enterprise may find it more profitable to centralize authentication and authorization than to have to create admin accounts for dozens of different applications and have people trained to work with them. Which returns us to item #2. If Active Directory or some other central security database is the norm in your shop, a document management webapp that's using the container security system can be wired into it without adding any Java code to the security process. Plus, it's also possible to use Single Signon, where the user signs in once (perhaps via the Windows user login) and has no further need of individual accounts and passwords.

So before considering creating a user manager, first, I'd recommend looking at what pre-debugged apps you might consider using and secondly, what their security systems require.
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
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