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Interfacing to legacy systems via RPC

 
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I have a requirement for a web client to work with a large, legacy server system. This system has an API of approximately 200 functions and is documented in C. The system also provides C libraries for Windows and Macintosh development, and we have rolled our own Java interface.

I have a good deal of Java experience and a lesser amount of JavaScript experience, though none with Node.js. I am looking at Node.js for client-server development (as well as Python for server only). I see there is a Node.js module sunrpc_server (https://nodejsmodules.org/pkg/sunrpc_server) but there's no information that tells me how I might use it or if it could even do what I need, which is make an RPC connection to this remote legacy system, send properly packed RPC parameters, and unpack the response to each call.

When I've investigated the RPC claims of languages outside of C, what I find are examples of an application talking to another app in the same language and no mention of legacy systems. As I said, for Java we had to roll our own--writing our own RPC hand-shaking and packing and unpacking parameters for each call. This was no small effort. What might Node.js offer that would get me moving quickly?
 
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Thad Humphries wrote:I have a requirement for a web client to work with a large, legacy server system. This system has an API of approximately 200 functions and is documented in C. The system also provides C libraries for Windows and Macintosh development, and we have rolled our own Java interface.

I have a good deal of Java experience and a lesser amount of JavaScript experience, though none with Node.js. I am looking at Node.js for client-server development (as well as Python for server only). I see there is a Node.js module sunrpc_server (https://nodejsmodules.org/pkg/sunrpc_server) but there's no information that tells me how I might use it or if it could even do what I need, which is make an RPC connection to this remote legacy system, send properly packed RPC parameters, and unpack the response to each call.

When I've investigated the RPC claims of languages outside of C, what I find are examples of an application talking to another app in the same language and no mention of legacy systems. As I said, for Java we had to roll our own--writing our own RPC hand-shaking and packing and unpacking parameters for each call. This was no small effort. What might Node.js offer that would get me moving quickly?



Hi Thad,

I'd suspect that you'd have to roll your own with Node as well. I know of RPC systems, but they're more geared towards new development rather than interfacing with existing, non-Node systems. Rolling your own with Node, however, may be easier than in Java. Node is a pretty good framework for rapidly developing TCP/IP functionality. Maybe what you should do is try out Node's net module to get a feel for whether it would be doable.

Cheers,
Mike
 
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