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Matan Bar Lev
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Hi!

I've read a lot of recommendations about this book, so I've decided to read it.
It's really a great book with great and original explainations.
One thing that bothers me is that there are almost no programming exercises. I don't think that learning programming is effective whithout writing code "on hands".
Do you know any resource of exercises that match the order of subjects in this book?
Unfortunately, if I don't find any appropriate exercises, I will have to look for another book :-(

 
Campbell Ritchie
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Welcome to the Ranch

There are some on the web. Try codingbat (formerly called Javabat). That is about writing little methods, many of them static, which are supposed to produce a certain output/return value. It is really easy surprisingly difficult.
We have the Cattle Drive, but you have to pay for that.
Other people will doubtless think of other exercises.

Project Euler is popular, but that is as much about mathematical algorithms as programming.
 
Matan Bar Lev
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Thanks for your answers.
Finally, I decided to take another book.

I think it's so frustrating that the authors put in so much effort in writing such a friendly book, and don't think of how to make the reader practice programming.

 
Heena Agarwal
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Actually you know what. Ok before that- my disclaimer - Following is just my view and it can be different from others' view.

Exercises are good. But we don't always have to depend on authors for the exercises.

Install JDK. Setup the environment. Read each chapter in bits. Write a program that tests everything you have studied. Read a paragraph. Test it. Read next. Test it.

Try various combinations when you read about something. For example, adding two byte types together, adding a byte and an int, what if you assign a large number to a byte type primitive etc...

 
Robert D. Smith
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Since Campbell mentioned the Cattle Drive, I will add that the list of lessons are available on the Cattle Drive page. I have found them extremely helpful. The downside, though, is the lack of feedback. I won't post questions asking for advice, since a) I am not paying and b) I don't want to give away any solutions. The most frustrating thing for me is a given problem will state that the instructors solution is 35 lines and I solved it in 17, including lines with just the '}'. I keep wondering what I missed, but then I look and the output is what the problem wanted.

Another alternative is come up with a small application that will fill a need that you have. Everyone needs an inventory of their book collection (or music, baseball cards or stamps). Start small and add to it as you get more familiar with the language.

Regards,
Robert
 
fred rosenberger
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I think there are tons of examples/exercises in there that let you "practice programming". Remember that programming is about 90% thinking, and only 10% writing code, and that book really made me think.

I recall (and I haven't looked at my copy in years) there being a lot of code examples in the book you can type in and experiment with, which IMHO is the best way to learn in any case.

Maybe this book isn't your style, and I think Bert and Kathy would both agree their book isn't for everyone. But that doesn't make it a bad book.
 
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