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How do I access Javac?  RSS feed

 
Jasmine Al
Greenhorn
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Hi everyone, I'm very new to this so please don't mind my series of silly questions, disclaimer aside can someone help translate this for me?

Once you've downloaded and unpackedfzippedfwhatever (depends on which version and for
which OS). you need toadd an entry toyour PATH environment variable that points tothe fbln
directory inside the main Java directory. For example, if the J2SDK puts adirectory on your
drive called "j2sdk1.5,O', look insidethat directory and you'lI find the "bin" directory where the
Java binaries (the tools) live. The bin directory isthe one you need aPATH to, sothaI when you
type:
% javac
at the command-line, your terminal will know how tofind the javac compiler.

I have tried typing in %javac to the command prompt, javac, cd javac to no avail. What am I doing wrong? How do I fix it?

Thanks!
J
 
Roger Sterling
Ranch Hand
Posts: 426
Eclipse IDE Fedora Linux
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Welcome to Java Ranch.

Please take a look at this and see if it helps you : http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/environment/paths.html

You might also fare better with using Eclipse instead of trying to compile using the JDK.

https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/
 
Jasmine Al
Greenhorn
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Thanks a lot! It worked
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
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Welcome again

I disagree; IDEs like Eclipse have so many features that many people get stuck on the features of the IDE and that occupies all their brain capacity, leaving little space to learn the language.
 
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal
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IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
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I agree with Campbell: avoid an IDE until after you learn how to utilize the command line to compile and run Java applications. Then you will be in a better position to know what the IDE is doing behind the scenes, and to understand the things that the IDE will hide from you.
 
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