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How do I install Java in Linux?  RSS feed

 
Greenhorn
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Hey there everyone!

I am trying to install Java on my Debain based Linux OS and can`t seen to figure it out. I first typed "chmod +x jdk-8-nb-8-linux-i586.sh", than typed
"./ jdk-8-nb-8-linux-i586.sh" to install it. It started to install, but than it gave my this message: (computer name has been changed)

bobsmith@bobsmiht-OptiPlex-GX620:~/Downloads$ ./jdk-8-nb-8-linux-i586.sh
Configuring the installer...
Searching for JVM on the system...
Preparing bundled JVM ...
./jdk-8-nb-8-linux-i586.sh: 1: eval: /tmp/.nbi-5045119.tmp/jre-7u4-linux-i586.bin: not found
Cannot prepare bundled JVM to run the installer.
Most probably the bundled JVM is not compatible with the current platform.
See FAQ at http://wiki.netbeans.org/FaqUnableToPrepareBundledJdk for more information.


How do I fix this? My Linux computer is not connected to the internet, I don`t know if this is a problem or not.

Thanks in advance for you help!



 
Ranch Hand
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Welcome to Javaranch. Installing Java on Linux is as easy as unpacking a grip file. Just download it from Oracle and using the tar utility to unpack it. I'm not aware of the process that you are trying to do to install Java.
 
Java Cowboy
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Did you look at the FAQ page which is mentioned in the error message? It explains what might be causing this and what you can try.
 
Marshal
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It is in our FAQ. You unzip the .tar.gz file in some directory or other. I usually create a directory /usr/java and then use sudo chown … to move ownership to the user rather than to root, and unzip the .tar.gz into that directory.
Then you want to change your PATH by editing the .bashrc file, which usually lives in your ~ directory.
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