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Design patterns book

 
Rajesh So
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Hi,

Cade & Sheil advised the reader to refer the following books for knowledge on patterns.

Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software;
Gamma, Erich, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, and John Vlissides
(1995 Edition)

Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies, 2nd
Edition; Alur, Crupi, and Malks (2003 Edition)

Cade & Sheil has helped me scope my knowledge that is required for the exam. This is useful.

My question is the "Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software" is not specific for Java. Hence, it reduces my preparation productivity. I have very less time outside my work and would like to be productive. Can you please suggest a JAVA specific book that can be replacement for this book.

Regards,
Rajesh
 
Dieter Quickfend
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Real World Java EE Patterns by Adam Bien is definitely advisable. Are you doing 5 or 6?

If you are so stressed for time you cannot read GoF, perhaps it is advisable to wait until you have time to prepare for this exam. It is not a walk in the park. Don't underprepare. Even if you can somehow make it through the exam, you still have the assignment, and more importantly, the future. Cade & Sheil might be the best book to prepare for the exam, it does not by itself make you a good architect.

If you are doing 6, I would definitely also read Bitter Java and Bitter EJB, if I were you. It will get you some valuable points on the exam.
 
Rajesh So
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Hi Dieter,

I am appearing for OCMJEE 6.

GoF is not specific for Java. The reader has to find a way to apply the concept for Java. I felt I may misinterpret the reading. Hence, my question if there are alternatives for GoF. I understand from your reply that GoF is the most reliable source for the exam, assignment and career.

I am conversant with EJB. The reviews for Bitter EJB tell that its a book for beginners. Is that true?

When you mentioned Bitter Java, did you please mention Better, Faster, Lighter Java ?

Both these books are published in 2003, 04. Are they relevant now?
 
Tim Cooke
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Head First Design Patterns takes a subset of the GoF patterns and presents them a little more long hand using Java coded examples for illustration.
 
Dieter Quickfend
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I meant Bitter Java (http://www.manning.com/tate/)

I am an EJB Expert and I already was before I took Pt 1. I had read nor Bitter EJB, nor Bitter Java. I passed, but my passing score was not completely to my liking. Most of the points I lost was because of terminology I did not know such as Golden Hammer and Cacheless Cow. While I am experienced enough to identify said antipatterns, I did not know their names or enough to match an anti-pattern to the description, which lost me quite a few points. I may perhaps have been unlucky, but, while I was very prepared and knowledgeable about design patterns (GoF, Core J2EE, Head First Design Patterns, Real World Java EE Patterns, Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, Refactoring, etc.), my OCMJEE exam asked just as many questions about the anti-patterns described in these two books... By which I was completely taken off guard.

The relevance of these anti-patterns is undeniable. Unless you already know what "Split Cleaners" means, or the problems created by the Magic Servlet anti-pattern, and all the others present in these books... You may walk away with the idea "Ok, maybe I knew not to do all these things, they're just common sense" like I did, but it will still cost you points on the exam if you forego it.

If you find a better source of common anti-patterns, of course you're welcome to choose that one. They were named in these books, and I like to get my info at the source.
 
Rajesh So
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Thanks Tim. I will start with HF Design patterns.
Thanks Dieter. I have not heard any of the terms you mentioned. The terminologies are frightening.

When I started with OCMJEE6 preparation, I was concerned that I would do an never ending study and would never take up the exam. The Cade & Sheil book helped me scope the subjects. I understand from this thread that I may do too much of reading that has no end. By the time I complete all this, OCMJEE may release a versions 7 or 8. Have you faced this problem or am I the only one? Your suggestion will be immensely helpful at this time.
 
Dieter Quickfend
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Cade & Sheil is made for SCEA 5. There are no good preparation books available as of yet for OCMJEA6, which makes it a lot harder. You shouldn't worry about future versions of the exam. My current place of employment has the most modern software stack I've ever seen in a big governmental organization - and we're using Java EE 5, JPA 1.0 and JSF1.2. By the time anyone starts using Java EE 7, there will probably be a Java EE 10 coming out.

On top of that, the Architect Certification doesn't bind you as much to a certain technology or version as any other Java certification does. It's quite high level, and few will assume that you will spend your life under a rock after obtaining this certification. I never doubted about waiting for Java EE7, if anything, I doubted about taking the SCEA 5 one, 'cause at least that one has a study guide, which makes things a whole lot easier.

I studied using the Java EE specs and many books and notes, not all of which were useful for the exam. It helps that I like learning these things and don't really consider it a chore. If you would like something that you can study just enough to pass for, I would advise you to look at the SCEA 5 one, or perhaps TOGAF (though I have no personal experience in that regard, I have yet to take those). Cade & Sheil is good prep for the SCEA 5 certification, and you don't need much more than what they say you're going to need.
 
K. Tsang
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If you want a design patterns book in java then I recommend "Software Architecture Design Patterns in Java" by Partha Kuchana

It covers the GoF patterns and more. Worth a read to reinforce from java perspective.
 
Himai Minh
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How about Design Patterns in Java by Steven John Metsker and William C. Wake published by Addison Wesley?
 
Amritendu De
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I have read the Partha Kuchina book. It is a good read. Please note that GOF design patterns are not language specific like Java hence your understanding should be devoid of implementation however I understand it is good to remember if you code the pattern using Java language. I have not read the Steven John book so cannot comment on that.
 
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