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Is a 2003 book still useful for learning JUnit ?  RSS feed

 
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I came across what seems to be a nice beginner book to learn JUnit - Pragmatic Unit Testing in Java with JUnit.
Can someone please tell me if this 2003 book would still be relevant today ? If not, is there a similar beginner
book of < 250 pages for learning JUnit ?

Thank you.
 
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While I love that book, I think you are better off using a book that teaches JUnit 4. "Test Driven" is excellent. It is more than 250 pages. But you dan skip the later chapters as they cover more advanced concepts. And go back to them when you need to test code like that.
 
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:While I love that book, I think you are better off using a book that teaches JUnit 4. "Test Driven" is excellent. It is more than 250 pages. But you dan skip the later chapters as they cover more advanced concepts. And go back to them when you need to test code like that.



Thanks. I saw test-driven. It has little practical knowledge. I need something more hands on, with the theoretical stuff. I felt like I was in a philosophy
class instead of a developer class when I read that book.
 
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you can read the below books and both are very good books

1. JUnit Recipes - Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
2. Junit in action
 
Ali Gordon
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Thakur Sachin Singh wrote:you can read the below books and both are very good books

1. JUnit Recipes - Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
2. Junit in action



Have you read those books ? First one us very old and is a recipe book. Second one has poor reviews, but I will check it out.
I hate the "ZZZ in action" series books. Never good for beginners.
 
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Ali Gordon wrote:Thanks. I saw test-driven. It has little practical knowledge. I need something more hands on, with the theoretical stuff. I felt like I was in a philosophy
class instead of a developer class when I read that book.


Can you elaborate on what you found theoretical in "Test Driven"? I found it to be one of the more practical books that I've read. He covers a lot of the scenarios that show up in the real world. Recipe books are the other end of the continuum, but that doesn't sound what you are looking for.

Another way of thinking about this - what are some books you liked the style of? Not about JUnit, just in general. Knowing that will help us recommend something you might like better for JUnit.
 
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Ali Gordon wrote:I hate the "ZZZ in action" series books. Never good for beginners.


It depends upon the book. You need to carefully pay attention to the intended audience for the book. The preface to my jQuery in Action (2nd Ed) book clearly states that the book is not for someone who is completely unfamiliar with JavaScript, though no prior jQuery experience is necessary.
 
Ali Gordon
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:

Ali Gordon wrote:Thanks. I saw test-driven. It has little practical knowledge. I need something more hands on, with the theoretical stuff. I felt like I was in a philosophy
class instead of a developer class when I read that book.


Can you elaborate on what you found theoretical in "Test Driven"? I found it to be one of the more practical books that I've read. He covers a lot of the scenarios that show up in the real world. Recipe books are the other end of the continuum, but that doesn't sound what you are looking for.

Another way of thinking about this - what are some books you liked the style of? Not about JUnit, just in general. Knowing that will help us recommend something you might like better for JUnit.



Firstly, I think there is too much blah blah going on. I feel like I am listening in on coder gossip. Sampler -



Why do I need so much fluff ? He can say it like this -

According to different people quality of code can mean - number of defects discovered after using the software, internal or non visible traits like cost of dev, maintenance etc.
Through extensive test coverage (the percentage of your code for which you did tests) and having all the tests automated, TDD effectively guarantees that whatever you have
written a test for works, and the quality (in terms of defects) becomes more of a function of how well we succeed in coming up with the right test cases.
With TDD (test-code-refactor), you save time by writing software in increments that WORK instead of making huge code, testing it in the end and discovering many bugs.


Eg. For theoretical (I found one now) -


Figure 1.6 With incremental development—building the whole system in small increments—we are never
far from an integrated, working code base. This reduces risk, because the inventory of unfinished work
remains small. As we’ll learn later on, incremental development also enables effective learning through
early feedback based on the customer and developers constantly seeing actual, working software



Mark dexter's tuts, although meant to mainly teach eclipse, taught me way more practical TDD with Junit than this book.
 
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