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To find who writes messages on my local queue  RSS feed

 
siva kohli
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Hi,
We are in the process of decommissioning an application.
Now we need to inform the upstream application that send messages to our application to stop sending messages.

There is no documentation that says who is the owner of a particular queue tha sends messages to us.

We have few queues where there is still messages flowing in and few obsolete queues with no message flow.

Is there a way to find out which remote queue has a target of our local queue.
The problem here is that the upstream is on a different queue manager.

App 'a' has a remote queue on qmgr 'a' which points to our App 'b''s local queue which is on qmgr 'b'.
How to find out the name of remote queue manager 'a' ?
 
Paul Clapham
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Hi Siva, welcome to the Ranch!

I suspect that the easiest way to find out who is sending messages to your queue is this: Turn off the queue for a while and see who calls your support line to tell you that the queue is down. That would be the person who needs to be informed to stop sending messages.

I don't know how long you should wait for calls -- that would depend on the other applications and your organizational structure. For example the other application might only send messages at the end of each month.
 
siva kohli
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Thanks Paul.
That would be ideal for the queues where there is still message flow.
But we have few queues which are no more used/ turned OFF. This is what i see as a challenge here. Is there a way to find out technically the sender application?
We need to make sure no one , even in future uses the queues since the qmanager itself will be decommissioned.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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If they're no longer used, I would assume that their associated functionality has been replaced with something else, or has become obsolete. In that case, does it matter? The sender apps will hopefully have implemented proper error handling so that someone notices that sending fails, and can take appropriate action in shutting it down.

Or you could change the handling of the incoming messages to log where they are coming from (I'm assuming, obviously, that there is is such a notion as a "sender" in the incoming messages - you didn't say what kind of queue, and what technology, we're talking about.)

As a last resort, you can put some kind of firewall in place that lets all incoming connections through to the port where the messages are delivered (assuming that works via TCP/IP), and which logs the IP addresses from where those connections are made.

Oh, and I do feel compelled to point out that it amazes me that the receiver of a message has no idea who the sender might be. Is there no registration or authentication in place?
 
Paul Clapham
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I'm not that surprised. Allowing anybody in the organization to send requests to a queue -- that probably isn't very unusual. And setting up other systems so that it isn't clear who is actually using them to send those messages -- this all sounds very familiar, like the company I used to work for and the applications I used to work on. At least we had the advantage that there was only one application and only one group of people managing it.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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If it's all within the same organization then I can (just) imagine it. In that case the "turn it off and see who complains" approach is probably manageable.
 
fred rosenberger
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Ulf Dittmer wrote:If it's all within the same organization then I can (just) imagine it. In that case the "turn it off and see who complains" approach is probably manageable.

Scream test, FTW!!!
 
Jaikiran Pai
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By the way, what kind of queues are we talking about and which vendor?
 
siva kohli
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Somehow managed to find most of the applications that send in the messages. by looking at the messages, queue names, and by stopping few queues.
The product is IBM MQ.
Is there a possibility that multiple remote queues can target one alias/local queue on a different queue manager?
 
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