• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

[Beginner] Which books to read, which software to use?  RSS feed

 
michael Hannigan
Greenhorn
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi guys,

A lot of people have been telling me to check out these books for beginners:
Core Java, Thinking in Java, Head First Java, Dietel's Java-How to Program

followed by Intermediate books: Effective Java, Java Concurrency in Practice.

Are these beginner books really good for someone starting out (actually i have learned some java in the past, but that was 10 years ago) if, so, which one out of these 4 beginners books would you recommend? Or are there any other great alternatives?


Secondly, which software (code editor) do you guys like?

Netbean? IntelliJ? (can i use android studio?)

thanks in advance, and what a great community! i'm really glad to have found this place.
 
Anayonkar Shivalkar
Bartender
Posts: 1558
5
Eclipse IDE Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi michael,

Welcome to CodeRanch!

If you have knowledge of OO concepts, then I would suggest Thinking in Java or Core Java (its not recommended for absolute beginners though).

Later on, you can go through Effective Java. If you want to have nice hand on multi-threading, then Java Concurrency in Practice is a good book - but it can be avoided if threading is not of your interest/priority.

Choice of IDE is matter of personal comfort in my opinion. I use Eclipse, but I learned Java on Notepad and vi editor.

I hope this helps.
 
michael Hannigan
Greenhorn
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anayonkar Shivalkar wrote:Hi michael,

Welcome to CodeRanch!

If you have knowledge of OO concepts, then I would suggest Thinking in Java or Core Java (its not recommended for absolute beginners though).

Later on, you can go through Effective Java. If you want to have nice hand on multi-threading, then Java Concurrency in Practice is a good book - but it can be avoided if threading is not of your interest/priority.

Choice of IDE is matter of personal comfort in my opinion. I use Eclipse, but I learned Java on Notepad and vi editor.

I hope this helps.


ah thanks.... and if if i was to look for a book for absolute beginner, which would you suggest? (it has been 10 years since i last touched it lol)
 
Anayonkar Shivalkar
Bartender
Posts: 1558
5
Eclipse IDE Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, in that case I would go for Head First Java or Thinking in Java (mostly Head First Java).

Btw at intermediate level, The Java Programming Language (by James Gosling) is also a good read.
 
michael Hannigan
Greenhorn
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anayonkar Shivalkar wrote:Well, in that case I would go for Head First Java or Thinking in Java (mostly Head First Java).

Btw at intermediate level, The Java Programming Language (by James Gosling) is also a good read.


thank you so much !

I downloaded IntelliJ, but do I need to download anything from the java web site? or does IntelliJ include everything?
 
Anayonkar Shivalkar
Bartender
Posts: 1558
5
Eclipse IDE Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry I'm not much aware of IntelliJ.

But I think all you'll need is an IDE (e.g. Eclipse, IntelliJ) and JDK (of course ) and you should be good to start.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 56529
172
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Disagree. I would suggest you get a decent text editor: suggestions here, put all your code in your new java folder, and don't use an IDE until you are more experienced.
Yes, you will need to download code from Oracle and install it and edit some environment variables. You will find all about that in our first program FAQ.

Agree with the suggestion that you read Head First. Since it is now a rather old book, you can pick up good quality second‑hand copies for a very reasonable price at Amazon or alibris. Get the 2nd edition.

And welcome again
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 56529
172
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You can probably also find that book on eBay.
 
Ja Shields
Greenhorn
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am pretty new to coding in general and a pretty visual learner. I love Head First Java because I feel like it better explains the vocabulary than some of the others that just assume you know what they are talking about. Just my two cents.
 
Kat Rollo
Ranch Hand
Posts: 62
Eclipse IDE Java MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Book: Java Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 5E (D.S. Malik)
While Head First Java is a comical book, Java Programming is quite the textbook type. It is a very good reference for beginning Java programmers/students with useful notes, tables, and code samples (with accompanying explanations). For a textbook, it is easy on the eyes without the dry walls of text. A "Quick Review" comes at the end of every chapter, which is a numbered list of the important points discussed. Answers to odd numbered exercises are also available at the back of the book, which is very useful for self studying.

Text Editor: Notepad++ / PSPad Editor
When it comes to text editors, Notepad++ is a common choice. Not too fancy and lacks the intellisense/code completion features of IDEs, but this is where beginners should ideally start - code the program manually in a text editor and compile/run via cmdline. Be sure to install JDK and set the PATH and CLASSPATH in the Environment Variables before starting to work on your beginning Java programs.

PSPad Editor is a good choice too.

IDE: Eclipse Standard / Eclipse for Java Developers
After using normal text editors, you will begin to greatly appreciate using an IDE - I know I did when I first started using Eclipse. An IDE can help you very much with debugging, warning you immediately of syntax errors, suggesting possible fixes, and automatically completing lines of code for you. Again, JDK is required. Eclipse is a widely known and well supported IDE.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 56529
172
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome to the Ranch
I was not familiar with PSPad.
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!