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Best book or way to learn servlet and jsp?  RSS feed

 
Ed Cardenas
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Hi Ranchers!
Do you know any good book to learn servlet and jsp?
What is the best way to learn java ee?
Can you give me any tips for becoming a java ee developer?

Thanks in advance!
 
J. Kevin Robbins
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I'll assume you have some experience with core Java. If not, you need to start there before venturing into the JEE world. You'll find plenty of books reviewed in The Bunkhouse. One of the classics is Head First Servlets and JSP, usually referred to around here as HFSJ. Don't get mired in frameworks like Struts or Spring just yet, there will be time for that later. Stick to the basics for now.

But at the end of the day, the best way to learn is write code and then write some more. When you are done with that, write some more. Setup Tomcat or Apache on your system so you have a local web server and dive in.
 
Ed Cardenas
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Hi Keviin! Yes I already have experience with core java and a ocajp7 passer. I need to learn java ee so I can find better job opportunities because
most java developer positions require experience with java ee particularly struts,spring,ejb,xml,webservices,soap,json, and rest.

Thanks for your tips!
Do you think headfirst servlets and jsp 2nd edition is still ok even if it's still based on java 1.5?
How about murachs servlets and jsp 2nd edition book? Is that ok?
 
J. Kevin Robbins
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Yes, HFSJ is still relevant because you are wanting to learn how to construct a web app. The api details don't matter so much at this point in your learning. You are working toward the big picture. I'm not familiar with the Murachs book, but I'm sure it's reviewed in the Bunkhouse.

A few other points:
Struts, Spring: avoid frameworks for now. Learn to do things the "hard" way before you get into the tools that do the work for you. Ditto for ORMs like Hibernate. Learn the Oracle stuff first.
EJBs: Not as commonly used as you might think. Others may disagree with me on this, but many shops that ventured into this area found that it was more painful than it was worth. Some very large Enterprise applications use them, but I don't see a lot of call for EJB experience in the job market in my area. Your mileage may vary.
XML: This is a given as far as understanding the web.xml and so on, but as far as Ajax, it's fallen by the wayside in favor of JSON.
Web Services: Growing in popularity and this a good area to get into. I need more experience in this myself. Note that SOAP has fallen out of favor and the market has moved to RESTful services.

One thing you didn't mention except in the context of JSON and that's JavaScript. If you want to do client-side work you absolutely need to learn this, but it's a whole different skill set. Learn to use Ajax and a JavaScript framework such as jQuery or ExtJS. You'll find most of the folks around here lean toward jQuery.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Excellent post, J. Kevin. I agree whole-heartedly with everything except one small point, and that's ExtJS. On the client-side, the mainstream is moving to MVC frameworks such as Backbone and AngularJS. Frameworks such as ExtJS and Dojo are, in my opinion, falling by the wayside. jQuery is a still a must as it serves as a platform for many of the MVC frameworks; so learning jQuery is still an important step for client-side development.

And to emphasize an important point that J. Kevin made: do not start diving off into the server-side frameworks until after you have a really good grasp of basic Servlets and JSP.
 
J. Kevin Robbins
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Thanks, Bear. I agree with you on jQuery. With all the incredible plugins available for it, I think it can't be beat. I've never used ExtJS and I only mention it because I still see it mentioned in job postings, so somebody out there is using it. I've never used Dojo either but I rarely see it mentioned as a job requirement so I didn't think about that one.
 
William Brogden
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On the browser side, it is a big help to use a browser having functions that let you see exactly what your server side is sending.

The Firefox browser has a rich array of tools such as Firebug. Many mysterious problems have been resolved by being able to see browser internals.

Bill
 
Bear Bibeault
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Excellent point, Bill. All modern browsers (even modern IE! ) have some really excellent debugging tools built right in. I like the WebKit tool set the best, but it's great to be able to debug in any browser.

Dealing with legacy IE is just as much a pain in the ass as it's ever been.
 
Ed Cardenas
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Hi Rancheros!

Thank you very much for your great responses.
I am now decided to stick with HFSJ 2nd edition, to strengthen my core servlets and jsp skills even though it's only java 1.5 (still relevant based on kevin).
After finishing it, I will get back to this forum to check what to study next so I can call my self a real java ee developer.

 
Rihan Pereira
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Hi there Ed Cardenas!

well,my solution to your problem is that you should definitely do some googling on open source projects in context with java.There is loads of java code in open source pool.since you said you already have some experience with java core(I assume that would be data structures and alogrithms).Its a new trend created to show off open source work in applicant's resume.For example, the xwiki project is a wiki completely based on java enterprise and they welcome java developers at any level.I am diving in that project.I suggest you check out the "developer guide" of that project ,figure out what part of the project interest you.They have getting started guide for that part of the project.you will get insights into real world java code[P.S this will take some time to get familiar with the code base and coding standards and associated technologies].In case you find that you still lack the potential or ability to contribute to this or any other java project then you work out on that weakness,come back in that project,start contributing code and you start again.This is how you improve yourself or take yourself to the next level.Once you have done that I bet you will never be the same person again.This will not happen if you keep on doing java certifications and memorizing content till you pass the exam.Certifications dont teach you to write code they teach you to memorize code.Thats insane!Open Source projects have communities with upstream and downstream developers and potential long term contributors who review your code and criticize you till it gets robust enough to work with other components.There lies a real gut!This is what I learned over last 8 months and so I am telling you.go for open source project!


 
Ed Cardenas
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Hi Rihan!
Yup, I am currently working as a java developer in which my projects are based on java ee(xml,soap,webservices,struts,spring,etc.).
That's why I want to have a solid grasp of servlets and jsp before diving into java ee.
You have good point here.
Certifications dont teach you to write code they teach you to memorize code

Thanks for your useful remark, I will also check on that website you shared.
 
Abhay Agarwal
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Simple - pick any good book [ a list can be found on Code ranch ] , get a good servlet container like Tomcat or Jetty. After that , as you read along the book .. keep on writing code and deploy in servlet container. write code for every minute detail ...I agree that this shall take more time to learn servlet and jsp but this shall help you to gain confidence in writing servlet and jsp code.
This is the technique which I applied when I started learning servlet jsp four years back.
 
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