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Murach's Java Servlets and JSP: A couple of questions  RSS feed

 
eric givler
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The book outline didn't appear to mention other parts of JSTL such as FMT, XSL and SQL. Can you explain why that was ignored?

The book did mention MVC briefly in an earlier chapter. From there, does it build on top of that idea and create an MVC based application that uses JSPs as the presentation/view layer?

Does the book go into general architecting of an application even though the application uses JSPs. A book that would really help Java developers who want to start web development would be something that goes over all the areas of concern (even briefly) such as a service layer and a dao layer, and a controller handling layer, then ties it together into the view.

Someone else also mentioned JSF, I don't really have any comments on that since it IS a JSP book.

Does the book mention about features that are specific to newer server containers and how to take advantage of them?

Does the book talk at all about client-side code in terms of jQuery or Javascript and the role it plays in an application that uses JSPs as views?


In any case, I'd like to read it at some point, just to brush up on my JSP skills, and I'm glad to see another book out there regarding this very useful technology.

Thanks for your time,
Eric
 
Bruce Alspaugh
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There is an example music store application illustrating how to architect an MVC application that uses servlets and JSPs. It uses JSPs as the presentation/view layer and servlets as the controller. There are actually two different versions of the music store application, one using JDBC and the other using JPA, and a comparison of the two approaches. The book has chapters that show how to install and use MySQL, and how to write basic SQL to create and drop tables, and simple insert, update, delete and select statements. From there, it shows how to build the data layer of your application using either JDBC or JPA. The JPA examples use the EclipseLink library. There is a crash course in HTML5 and CSS3, but little discussion of Javascript or jQuery. Murach has separate books dedicated to MySQL, HTML5/CSS3, and Javascript/jQuery respectively. What I find missing, as I mentioned in other posts, is how to automate the testing using JUnit or TestNG, and manage the dependencies using Maven.
 
Joel Murach
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Hi Eric,

Bruce does a good job of explaining what the book covers as far as application architecture. As for your other questions:

Regarding the JSTL chapter: The main sample application for the book only used tags from the core library, so we didn't feel we needed to describe the other libraries (fmt, xsl, etc.) in this book. We do mention them so the reader knows that they exist. But I decided to leave our more detailed coverage of these libraries because I wanted to keep the book as short as possible (it's over 700 pages) and I thought the book had already taught enough JSTL that the reader should be able to learn more about the other libraries if he or she should need them.

Regarding the JSF chapter: In retrospect, I can see that we should have called this chapter "An introduction to JSF" or something like that. This chapter is really only designed to show how the JSF approach compares to the servlet/JSP approach. For a reader who has just learned the basics of the servlet/JSP approach, I think this is interesting, but it's not intended to be complete coverage of JSF.

Regarding newer servlet containers: No, the book doesn't really delve into features that are specific to the newer containers. The book is geared towards beginning to intermediate Java web programmers, and it seems to me that those features are probably too advanced for the target audience.

Regarding jQuery and JavaScript: The book explains the concept, but doesn't provide any coverage of JavaScript or jQuery. Again, this is largely to keep the book to a manageable size. As Bruce mentioned, our company does provide separate books on these topics.

Thanks!

Joel
 
eric givler
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Thanks a lot for the quick response. It sounds like a book definitely worth having on the shelf, especially if you're in a position where you have to maintain and enhance Java Web applications that make use of this technology. I applaud your efforts.
 
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