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Career Advice Java Programmer/Analyst

 
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Hi,
I did my MBA in information systems and worked in sales ( Oracle,India). Then I got married and moved to the US and worked as a Programmer/Analyst ( Java) for close to 4 years.
Eventually I want to lead a team but I feel that I am not very sound technically. I can manage well in my job but I don't think I am a good java developer. I just wanted to know what kind of jobs can I apply for
after this experience?
Any advice would be highly appreciated
 
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namita rawal wrote:
I did my MBA in information systems and worked in sales ( Oracle,India). Then I got married and moved to the US and worked as a Programmer/Analyst ( Java) for close to 4 years.
Eventually I want to lead a team but I feel that I am not very sound technically. I can manage well in my job but I don't think I am a good java developer. I just wanted to know what kind of jobs can I apply for
after this experience?
Any advice would be highly appreciated



I know quite a few great managers, who are not very technically sound. IMO, there is nothing wrong with leading a team with that weakness. However, you have to be clear in that regard -- you need to have technical people who you trust, and not engage (or have limited engagement) in the technical discussions.

Management is a skill. IMO, a manager with great management skills, and so-so technical skills, is better than a manager with great technical skills, and so-so management skills.

Henry
 
namita rawal
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Thanks Henry. That was very encouraging. So what kind of jobs can I apply now. I know I can't apply as a Lead but can I apply for positions of a product manager or a project manager?
 
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You seem to have an interesting background: working in sales then move to programming, backed by MBA (IS).

The key to being a good manager is understanding the people around you (your team). Knowing their strengths and weaknesses, finding a balance to utilize resources/ talent in solving problems.

A manager is usually a generalist or will become one as time goes by. Yet having knowledge in one or two specialties can sometimes help in the early stages.
 
namita rawal
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I agree K.Tsang that you need to have the soft skills to be a manager and I am confident I do have that but question is how do I go applying for managerial positions? All the companies look for experience in managing teams.
 
K. Tsang
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Then you need to mention the following:
* the team size (at least the part you worked on)
* whether you lead the development (implementation) part
* whether you participated in requirement gathering and/or design phase of project

Basically show them (potential employers) you are a leader in the things you are working on. In the early going, you may not want to set the expectation too high (eg getting a PM title) but probably a senior xxx or team lead title.

Good luck
 
namita rawal
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Thanks for the pointers. Are the team leads not required to be very technical?
 
K. Tsang
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namita rawal wrote:Thanks for the pointers. Are the team leads not required to be very technical?



"very" technical? I doubt. In fact it depends on the person's personality. Everyone is different somewhat. There are people who like to "share knowledge" while others hog tasks to do.

From a subordinate viewpoint, I'm sure he/she wants a "share knowledge" personality type and able to "delegate" accordingly.
 
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