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Updating J2SE to J2EE

 
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Hi

I am a java developer for the past one year and I have been working only in J2SE and I would like to learn J2EE. Most of the companies require some frameworks in addition to J2EE knowledge. Either Struts, Spring or Hibernate. I am confused on how and where I should start. Can you people give me some guidance?
 
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Hi,

The JEE platform was flawed back in the days so several frameworks solved the problems with a better approach. I'd go for bare JEE in the beginning to understand the pain and right after that go for Spring + Hibernate as they are both pretty cool and pretty much required everywhere. Going straight for the frameworks will make you act like a robot, you will not (fully) understand what's behind the framework.

Best,
Silviu
 
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To clarify some points:

The "2" has been dropped from these names long ago. It's not called "J2SE" and "J2EE" anymore, but just "Java SE" (Standard Edition) and "Java EE" (Enterprise Edition) - although many people and companies are still using the old names.

Java EE is a collection of APIs for things that are commonly used for server-side Java software. Struts, Spring and Hibernate are not part of Java EE.

Struts is an (old) web application framework, which builds upon servlets and JSPs. The servlet and JSP APIs are part of Java EE.

The Spring framework is a very big library with support for many different technologies. It is not part of Java EE, in fact it is for a large part an alternative for Java EE.

Hibernate is an object-relational mapping (ORM) framework. It's an implementation of the JPA (Java Persistence API), which is part of Java EE.
 
Partheban Udayakumar
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Silviu and Jesper

Thanks for your clarifications but I still need advice on how and where to start?
 
Silviu Burcea
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How about this? http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/7/tutorial/doc/home.htm
 
Jesper de Jong
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Java EE is a big collection of APIs. There are ofcourse books available, but you can also start by looking at Oracle's Java EE 7 Tutorial - but that is, by itself, already a very long document.

You could also try to learn a bit about the Spring framework first, see the Spring guides.

It's very hard to say in general whether it's better to look at Java EE or at Spring and Hibernate - some companies use one, some companies use the other, some companies use both. You'd have to find out in your own environment what the companies that you are interested in value more.

Whether you start by learning Java EE or Spring, both of them are big things, so don't expect to learn everything about either in a short time. Pick a subset, for example learn something about servlets and JSPs, or Spring's Web MVC, and when you feel you have some knowledge, have a look at some other part. Don't think that anyone expects you to know these frameworks by heart from beginning to end - they are so big that almost nobody knows that, not even experienced developers know every detail of these framework by heart.
 
Partheban Udayakumar
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Silviu,

Thanks for the link. I have already seen it but wasn't intrested as it was a long documents. I mostly prefer video tutorials and practical knowledge. Incase of books, I can tolerate books as Head first Java so that I won't be bored when I am trying to learn.

Jesper,

Thanks for the information. I agree to your point. Even the most experienced developer won't know things by heart. I want to improve my knowledge in java and continue as java developer. That is my aim as of now. That is why I asked for tutorials on JEE.
 
Silviu Burcea
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Maybe you want a learn by example approach then? https://github.com/javaee-samples/javaee7-samples
 
Partheban Udayakumar
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Silviu

Thanks for the link I will surely look into them.
 
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