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Need advice and study material for an Advanced Database Module

 
Benjamin Scabbia
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Hello guys,

I am currently studying a Masters in Computer Science (for people with non CS degrees) and I am considering studying for my next module "Advanced Databases". My concern is that I have never studied databases and I have very limited knowledge in the area. Messaging the head of the module I found out that I need to have some understanding of these 5 concepts:

1.The relational Model;
2.Relational Algebra (and maybe Relational Calculus);
3.SQL;
4.Entity-Relationship Modelling (ERM) and Enhanced ERM (we are using UML notations);
5.Transactions Management;

I have roughly 2 months to gain an understanding of the 5 subjects.

Can anyone recommend me some material/books that are suitable for a degree level and that will help me get up to speed with some of above concepts? Also any advice would be greatly appreciate it.

Thanks
 
Campbell Ritchie
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I am a bit surprised they will let you do Advanced Databases without doing Basic Databases first.
Try this part of the Java Tutorials for a start. Look in our books pages and you might find something useful there.

I shall move this discussion to a more appropriate location.
 
K. Tsang
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MSCS for non-CS? Is that really possible?

Anyway undergrad database course will cover material like SQL, ER modeling, logical/physical design, normalization, security and transaction management.

So I suggest you pick up any database management books and have a glance.

Yet I believe you should need drill on SQL quite a bit. Head First SQL here is probably a good choice for beginners. It should give some grounds in those areas.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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K. Tsang wrote:MSCS for non-CS? Is that really possible?
. . .
Yes, but the conversion MScs are going out of fashion.
 
Benjamin Scabbia
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:I am a bit surprised they will let you do Advanced Databases without doing Basic Databases first.
Try this part of the Java Tutorials for a start. Look in our books pages and you might find something useful there.

I shall move this discussion to a more appropriate location.


Thank you for the reply and sorry for posting in wrong section. I know that my university uses Java as the fundamental programming language, however, I am unsure if the module will cross over with java at this stage or whether it will be purely oriented on the database side (which is what I suspect), but interesting and very useful nonetheless!
Also +1 for the list of books! I will spend the evening evaluating my choices and purchase something in the next couple of days
 
Benjamin Scabbia
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K. Tsang wrote:MSCS for non-CS? Is that really possible?

Anyway undergrad database course will cover material like SQL, ER modeling, logical/physical design, normalization, security and transaction management.

So I suggest you pick up any database management books and have a glance.

Yet I believe you should need drill on SQL quite a bit. Head First SQL here is probably a good choice for beginners. It should give some grounds in those areas.


Yes it's a very strange format indeed. After studying a Business Economics degree for 3 years, I learnt (the hard way) that it really wasn't for me so I found this course which ties in nicely with my job (not much spare time though!).

Thanks for the recommendations, I have uses head first before (java & design patterns) and I was very impressed so I'm happy to go back to them. It is 2007 though, is that an issue? Also do you know if it covers any other areas which would prepare me for the module?
 
Benjamin Scabbia
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:I am a bit surprised they will let you do Advanced Databases without doing Basic Databases first.


The module is optional and since I came from a non CS degree, I have never studied it, so it's actually designed for people with prior experience so I'm really exposing myself... But I know the importance of databases so it's a challenge (or a gamble) that I'm willing to take
 
Joanne Neal
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Benjamin Scabbia wrote:Also +1 for the list of books! I will spend the evening evaluating my choices and purchase something in the next couple of days

If you prefer listening and watching to reading (and don't want to spend any money), this course from Stanford University is a great introduction to databases.
 
Benjamin Scabbia
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Joanne Neal wrote:
Benjamin Scabbia wrote:Also +1 for the list of books! I will spend the evening evaluating my choices and purchase something in the next couple of days

If you prefer listening and watching to reading (and don't want to spend any money), this course from Stanford University is a great introduction to databases.


Hi Joanne,

Thank you for the suggestion, seems to cover Relational Databases, Relational Algebra & SQL, so thats a huge win!! . (no idea how you found this little gem!).

Don't suppose you have any other recommendations for Entity Relationships & Transactions Management?

I'm also torn between these 6 books..., so if anyone could help me decide which might be most suitable, I would be MASSIVELY grateful!
1. The Language of SQL. By Larry Rockoff
2. Database Design for Mere Mortals. By Michael Hernadez
3. Sams Teach Yourself SQL in 10minutes. By Ben Forta
4. Learning SQL. By Alan Beauliue
5.SQL in Easy Steps
6. SQL Head First

Could anyone suggest which books I can use (along with the material you guys mentioned above), since I prefer learning from a book. I know very little on the subject, so I don't really know which (or combinations) of books would be best? Could someone help me filtering the list down to 1-2 books.

Thanks again guys
 
Joanne Neal
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Benjamin Scabbia wrote:no idea how you found this little gem!

I think it was originally offerred as a course on Coursera. If you haven't come across this site yet, it's well worth a browse, as is Udacity
 
Benjamin Scabbia
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Joanne Neal wrote:
Benjamin Scabbia wrote:no idea how you found this little gem!

I think it was originally offerred as a course on Coursera. If you haven't come across this site yet, it's well worth a browse, as is Udacity


Yes I've used Coursera in the past, it's very good (did a Python course). I've also heard of Udacity but never used it. I will keep an eye out for relevant courses. Thanks again!
 
Peter Rooke
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Two academic books we used many years ago;

Introduction to Database Systems - CJ Date
Fundamentals of Database Systems

That's a look to learn - good luck!
 
Benjamin Scabbia
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Peter Rooke wrote:Two academic books we used many years ago;

Introduction to Database Systems - CJ Date
Fundamentals of Database Systems

That's a look to learn - good luck!


Thanks for your reply and advice! I've gone for "Relational Theory for Computer Professionals by C. J. Date" which is fairly new and hopefulyl will get me up and running. But as soon as I finished that book (which Im hoping to get through quickly) I will be looking for new material and I will deffo check out the two above in-depth
 
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