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Apple Hand Pies

 
Marshal
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The subject of difficult-to-manage Pie Pastry came up in the Chicken Pot Pie topic, so I'm posting my recipe for Apple Hand Pies that feature a short pie pastry that's pretty well-behaved while rolling out.

I've posted this photo before, but apparently never the recipe. (I'll let Campbell convert the measurements for non-US folks, if he's willing ).



Bear's Pie Pastry

2 c (9 oz.) all-purpose flour
8 T unsalted butter, diced and frozen
1 T white sugar
1 t salt
7 T ice water

1. Put 1 c of the flour in food processor. Toss in the frozen butter, then top with the remaining flour.

2. Add salt and sugar, and pulse until the consistency of sand.

3. Add 6 T water while pulsing, until it all comes together. Looking down into the processor, add remaining water until the mixture just stops falling back against the center post.

4. Dump it out into a parchment sheet, and form into a patty.

5. Wrap in cling wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour before using.

Note: Omit sugar for a savory crust.


Bear's Apple Hand Pie Filling

3 T butter
2 large green apples (3 medium)
1/4 t salt
1/4 c white sugar
2 T brown sugar
1 1/2 t cinnamon, or to taste
1 T of water

1. Melt butter in skillet until just starting to brown.

2. Toss in apples with salt. Cook until beginning to brown.

3. Add sugars and cinnamon. Toss to coat.

4. Add water and remove from heat. Mix thoroughly until the water and sugars form a sauce.

5. Let cool before using in hand pies. (The heat will soften the dough too much for easy working.)


P.S. If anyone want assembly instructions, please post with a request.
 
Marshal
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Agree you need the dough cold; warm pastry is dreadful to handle. Because I can't find ordinary wholemeal flour I have to make do with strong flour. I tend to use 50/50 wholemeal and white flour (minus baking powder or similar) so at least the bread flour gives it some tensile strength.
Your 9oz flour is about 250g
Your 8Tbsp butter would appear to be about 4oz = 113g and 3Tbsp = 1½ oz about 40g.
Your 1Tbsp sugar is probably 1 Tbsp and the quarter cup probably about 3oz approx 85g.
Your 1 tsp salt is about 1tsp but I would use much less salt for ½lb flour. Maybe ¼ tsp.
Your 7 Tbsp water is about 3-4 floz about 100ml but that varies a lot; I usually use sunflower margarine and I require much less water for pastry than that. Usually under 2oz, so about 50ml. I think the margarine has some water in already so I use less water.
I usually use about 2oz sugar to 1lb apples; your three apples are probably a bit over a pound. I find the apple too sweet otherwise. I presume these are cooking apples? We have a Bramley tree, with sour cooking apples, some over ½lb in weight, so 3 apples would require maybe 2½oz flour slightly under the quarter cup in toto.

Ruth has recently bought some measuring cups; I had a look at them a few minutes ago and they are labelled ½cup=120ml and similar.

The Christmas pud went something like

CR wrote:We need 4oz suet: can you find a weight with 4 on

Small Boy 1 wrote:Yes, here's a 4.

CR wrote:Can you tell when you have the right amount? The scale pan goes down. Now put it in the bowl.

Small Boy 2 wrote:Can I stir it? Can I eat some of the raisins?

CR wrote:Only out of the packet, not out of the bowl.

I had them busy for a good twenty minutes.
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:I find the apple too sweet otherwise. I presume these are cooking apples?


Yes, I use Granny Smith apples which are green even when ripe, and stay tart and less sweet than other apples.

Small Boy 2 wrote:Can I stir it? Can I eat some of the raisins?

CR wrote:Only out of the packet, not out of the bowl.


 
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Mmmm, appelflappen!
 
Bear Bibeault
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Campbell Ritchie
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I have had greengrocers try to sell me Granny Smiths as cooking apples, but when you can get Bramleys you know the difference. A Bramley is much larger than any Granny Smith. Ours are not as large as maybe two years ago, when we had apples nearly 1lb each, but I cooked three today and they were well over 1¼lb (700g) altogether. That was only a crumble however.
A Bramley is full of malic acid when it is ripe and remains tart even when cooked with the 2oz sugar per pound, so they fight back against sweet pastry and custard, cream, or anything. They will keep in a cool place until February at least, but they don't remain unchanged. They gradually change texture and become fluffy and light after cooking, with a subtler flavour.

We had our Church fête a week and a bit ago; that is what all the pies mentioned earlier were for. Unfortunately the apple lost its label and was mistaken for a meat pie and was untouched by 1.30. I had one portion and a friend bought the remainder (almost) so it went to a good home eventually.
 
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The last place I had an appelflap was at van der Breggen at Brielle.
 
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