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entering rescue mode  RSS feed

 
Rrohit rakesh upadhyay
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Hello everyone,i had kali linux and windows 8.1 on my laptop,today i installed linux mint 17.1 kde in the partition acquired by kali linux after the installation was over and the computer restarted i got the following on my screen



GRUB loading
Welcome to Grub!

error:file not found
entering rescue mode...
grub rescue>


how do i fix this.please help
 
Richard Tookey
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I have not created a dual bool system for many many years and have never had this error message but since this is a new install I would initially just do a re-install of the Linux. If you still have the same problem your best bet might be to post on http://www.linuxforums.org/ .
 
Rrohit rakesh upadhyay
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i will try a reinstall,thanks.
 
Rrohit rakesh upadhyay
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restart did not work
 
Richard Tookey
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Rrohit rakesh upadhyay wrote:restart did not work


Did you mean 'restart' and not 're-install'?
 
Tim Holloway
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Grub works by selecting files, loading them and executing them. For Linux, that's typically a RAMDisk file followed by a Kernel file, although in some configurations there could be other files, too, such as a Xen hypervisor.

Your grub message says that Grub could not find one of those files, so booting could not proceed. It has diverted you into the grub shell so that you can attempt to boot manually. Lots of luck. The grub system is rather minimal and one of the things it lacks is a "dir/ls" function that could help you find the name/path of a suitable file. So if you go that route, write down what you need.

There are actually 2 versions of grub in play right now. The original grub used a menu file that defined the bootable kernels and was used to display the list of kernels. It was something you'd manually edit, although installing a kernel normally involved a process that would add the installed kernel to the menu automatically. The grub2 system is more magical and as far as I can tell, it just scans disk partitions looking for boot-worthy stuff without regard to an explicit list. Some Linux distros have advanced to grub2, some have not. The grub2 program is not only more self-maintaining, it also supports booting from filesystems and locations that the original grub could not handle, such as /boot in an LVM partition.

When your system first boots up and grub is executing, it often has a countdown before actually booting a kernel. During that interval, if you hit a key (conventionally the "x" key, but I don't think it matters), then the grub menu will display and you can alter the boot. You can select an alternate kernel, or you can edit the kernel spec line. One of the most common things I do is add the word "single" to the kernel spec options to boot into single-user (recovery) Linux. The edits are temporary for the current boot only, and the original grub.conf file isn't changed.

If you have damaged kernel files or the kernel indicates a different root filesystem, selecting an alternate kernel may help you get booted. If the kernels all use the same root filesystem and it is damaged, then you'll have to re-install Linux and let it update grub. Alternatively, you may be able to pop in a live CD/DVD/USB, boot an independent Linux off it and use that Linux to fix your original (disk) Linux.

If grub or the grub config files are damaged, that's also repairable, although it's a bit of a black art.

 
Rrohit rakesh upadhyay
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Oh,i mean reinstall.

On the internet i found an answer to a similar question and it suggested to perform the following.

(type) ls
>(hd0),(hd0,msdos1) ,(hd0,msdos3),(hd0,msdo2),(hd0,msdos4)
>ls (hd0,msdos3) #suppose this is linux
>set root =(hd0,msdos3)
>set


Do you think it will help,Tim.

when i typed " ls (hd0,msdos3)".It gave the the outpu "bad file system".With all the others it said "unknown file system".
 
Tim Holloway
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If you would be so kind as to send me a link to that page, I'd like to study it.

I don't dual-boot Windows and Linux. Truthfully, these days, it's easier to to simply bring up a VM and keep the primary OS running.

However, the boot process for Grub when booting Windows is quite different than what it does when booting any of the Unix-style OS's, it has been a long time since I looked at it, and I've never looked at how grub2 does it (if you're running grub2).

So I can't say if those commands make sense or not.

 
Rrohit rakesh upadhyay
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Sorry for late reply,Tim.I was searching for that link but i could not find it.

About my OS and boot process,this is what i did ,completely removed both the OS by installing a fresh windows 8.1,shrunk the C drive from disk manager by 50 gb,rebooted the laptop with mint dvd and installed mint in the 50 gb free space.And my computer is dual booting with windows and mint with grub 2 .

Thanks everone for helping me through.


 
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