Win a copy of Modern JavaScript for the Impatient this week in the Server-Side JavaScript and NodeJS forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Junilu Lacar
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Tim Cooke
  • Henry Wong
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • salvin francis
  • Frits Walraven
Bartenders:
  • Scott Selikoff
  • Piet Souris
  • Carey Brown

Java Web Developer interview experience

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This was my second interview at a company in Romania. The first "interview", if I might call it as such,
was actually a written test on core Java.
So after assessing it, the HR department called me in for the next phase, saying that I succesfully passed the minimum
requirements of the first phase of the recruitment process.
From the moment I had arrived, I was showed way to the commpany's conference room where I awaited for a
few minutes until the second recruiter came too.

The interview lasted for about an hour or so. It began with the general frame of the meeting,
where I was told how it will take place. It continued with the company's presentation,
what they do, what they are focusing on, their locations, how things are going in the company, basic stuff.
After this I was asked to present myself in order for them to get to know me from a general perspective.
They asked me to tell them why I chose such a different path from what I am currently doing,
what are my passions, and what I've been up to latelly, from a proffesional perspective speaking of course.

After presenting myself the real interview started.
The questions were from domains like Java core, databases, JavaScript, Jquerry, a simple problem to solve and some programming related concepts.

The actual questions, as accurately as I can reproduce them were as follows.

1. What is the difference between a abstract class and an interface?
My answer was that an abstract class is used for building a structure of classes,
a general construct, and it allows you to implement methods or to leave them unimplemented,
while an interface cannot have implemented methods, they should only be declared, while
the implementation has to be made wherever the interface is used.
The interviewer wasn't totaly satisfied with my answer, pointing out the fact that more important
than simply the theoretical difference is the practical bennefit of being able to use multiple interfaces on a new class
that you define, resulting in the bennefit of multiple inheritance.

2. What is the difference between overloading and overriding?
Overloading is when you write a same name method with a different signature (different arguments, return type, or both),
while overriding is when you rewrite the same method with the exact same signature.

3. What is prototyping?
I didn't know what this is exactly, I just heard of this term, but couldn't provide an asnwer.
I was told that it is a form of standardising the code that one writes, according to some agreements that
make code more readeble, reusable and maintainable. That is what I remember it.
This is not very precise actually. As I looked it up it seem to be a concept that JavaScript uses, but it isn't specific
to C++ or Java. So there is some explenation for me not knowing this.
To be more exact, as I understand prototype-based programming is a OOP facility that provide you the possibility to
use a "parent object", or prototype, to create a new class that inherits its specifics. Please look it up for more detailed
explanations.

4. How does one select some id's in Jquerry? What about a class?
Using $(#idName), respectively $(.className).

5. Write some code in Java that returns the longest ascending sequence from a given set of values. For example use
1 2 3 1 5 6 7 2 4. In this example the code should return 1 5 6 7 as it is the longest ascendent sequence of values from
the initial set.
Here I wrote down some code but couldn't give a final working version as I wasn't too inspired to write it down.
At some point, as the interviewers saw me struggling, they stoped me and asked to explain how I tried to do it.
They seemed to be satisfied with my theoretical solutions as I had 2 of them.

6. Tell us about the projects that you worked on.
As I don't have any remunerated experience in this area,
I told them about an online boutique-style website which I created for my master's degree,
and about a standalone software for a small business that can handle merchandise stocks.

7. What is the difference between a push and a get procedure in a web-database context?
My answer, without beeing too precise was that push is related to sending information while get is a request for receiving some
information from a server. From that point on we discussed some specifics on how stuff works behind the scenes when
a browser sends these signals.

Well I think that's it. There might have been some other few questions I can't really remember, but all in all, this
was the 2nd interview I had with this company. Hope this will help you guys in the process of getting the job you want.


If you have any questions I will gladly try to answer them.
Thank you for reading.







 
Author
Posts: 3448
 
Bartender
Posts: 1848
15
Eclipse IDE Spring VI Editor Java Linux Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

multiple interfaces on a new class that you define, resulting in the benefit of multiple inheritance.


This is really important. But it's not multiple inheritance because the implementor needs to implement each method on its own --there's no inheriting behavior.

(different arguments, return type, or both),


You can't just change the return type. It won't compile. So, different arguments or arguments and return type.

To be more exact, as I understand prototype-based programming is a OOP facility that provide you the possibility to
use a "parent object", or prototype, to create a new class that inherits its specifics.


I was interested in this one. I like this tutorial: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/design_pattern/prototype_pattern.htm
But the importance here is that maybe the constructor is expensive... this method allows you to skip object construction.

Sounds like you did all right!
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 61
1
IntelliJ IDE Tomcat Server Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Janeice,

You CAN change the return type. The new return type can be the same as the parent's return type OR a subclass of parent's return type.
 
Marshal
Posts: 70211
280
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think from Janeice's description that she is describing overloading not overriding. You can have covariant return types in overriding methods but Janeice is right that you cannot change the return type and create an overloaded method.
 
Bring out your dead! Or a tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic