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Advice on exam order

 
Des Robin
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Hi.

I am a about to write the JPA6 exam. My original plan was to follow that with EJB6 but I am moving onto a web services project at work so I am currently thinking of doing that instead.

Can anyone with experience doing these two exams give an insight on how easy/hard WSD6 is, without doing EJB6 first?

Thanks.
 
Frits Walraven
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Hi Des,

I always advice people to do the WCD and EJB exams first. Although it is not necessary it definitely helps as there are questions in the WSD exam that could have been on either of the other two.

Apart from that the WSD exam is a different ball game when you compare it to the other certification exams. More theoretical and conceptual, so it needs good understanding how Webservices play a role in the EE-world.

The thing that most people complain about is that there is no book targeting the exam. Nor is there any detailed description of the exam topics.

I hope I didn't discourage you though....

Regards,
Frits
 
Manish Verma
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Hi Frits,

Advice for me please: I have cleared OCEJWCD6 (Jan'15) and the OCPJP7 (Sep'14) exams. Like you said, it would make sense to do the EJB exam before the WSD exam. However, I have been told that EJB has not been well received in practice/actual real use. So, I was thinking of skipping EJB for now. However, I want to do the WSD exam. Do you see any problems?
 
Frits Walraven
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However, I have been told that EJB has not been well received in practice/actual real use.

EJB 3.1 is quite useful, we use it in all our projects nowadays. You are probably talking about the past (EJB 2.x).

o, I was thinking of skipping EJB for now. However, I want to do the WSD exam. Do you see any problems?

There is no problem, but it is a bit tougher to pass WSD without EJB background.

When you compare the two exams than WSD is a lot tougher than EJB. It requires more studying, and more reading from different sources. You can pass the EJB exam only by reading the EJB specs.
 
Manish Verma
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Frits Walraven wrote:EJB 3.1 is quite useful, we use it in all our projects nowadays. You are probably talking about the past (EJB 2.x).


I understand that esp. with EE6 onwards, Oracle have simplified EJB a lot. In a full-feature comparison, its quite similar to other more popular frameworks like Spring/Struts etc. However, I have been told that still due to a poor reception of older EJB versions, in practice, people still prefer and mostly use the frameworks rather than EJB. Is that the reality or have I been mislead?

From what I have read so far, I personally would prefer EE7 over Spring/Struts. But, the market, seems to, prefer Spring/Struts better, as I am told. So, I was thinking of skipping it.

 
Frits Walraven
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However, I have been told that still due to a poor reception of older EJB versions, in practice, people still prefer and mostly use the frameworks rather than EJB. Is that the reality or have I been mislead?

I think that for new applications people will eventually choose for EE6 (or EE7). The existing applications will probably remain coded with Spring, and there is nothing wrong with that.

From what I have read so far, I personally would prefer EE7 over Spring/Struts. But, the market, seems to, prefer Spring/Struts better, as I am told. So, I was thinking of skipping it.

Well, I am just part of one of those companies that shifted last year towards EE6. Personally, I enjoy coding against the API that I have learned during the preparations of my EE6-certifications. Spring 4 has EE6 as a baseline, so if you want to understand how Spring 4 works behind the scenes it will definitely help if you have the EE6-based certifications under your belt. Apart from that: you are not dependent on one company, and all the maven pom's look nicely empty
 
Manish Verma
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You are fortunate enough to work for a company that is open enough to move back to the standards. Good for you! However, my impression is that not many companies would switch to EE if they have been a framework house. That would cost the company, in terms of wasting existing talent/skills/experience/hiring/infrastructure etc. Secondly, a lot of framework developers are not even aware that newer EE versions are a lot simpler and they have vested interest in ignoring that even if they knew it. Who would want to work on the lesser used tech rather than the de-facto standards (frameworks). Not good for their CV/employability, I guess?

I will take a stab at EJB as a lower priority. Just started with WS Up and Running. If I can grasp the EJB related parts easily, then will try the WS first. Otherwise, will head to EJB exam first.
 
Des Robin
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Hi.

Thanks for all the feedback.

@Frits - I have completed the WCD exam but was hoping stepping to WSD exam would not require EJB.

Ah well.
 
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