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Core Java for the Impatient:book question  RSS feed

 
Shiva Gajjala
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Hi Author , the contents of the book seems interesting as it covers everything in core java. I have few questions

- Where do we use compiling API and scripting API?
-Can we learn from the scratch about annotations like how to create our own annotations and using it?
-Does Internationalization comes under core java ?

Thank you-
Shiva
 
Cay Horstmann
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Hi Shiva,

I agree with you that compiler and scripting APIs are intriguing. I cover both in the book. You'd use the compiler API when you generate Java code on the fly and need to have it compiled. That might be the case for test case generators, UI generators such as JSP, and so on. Frankly, it's pretty specialized stuff, but if you need it, it is very powerful. I wrote a code grader for my students (http://codecheck.it) that uses this API extensively.

Scripting is more universally applicable. There are lots of times when you want to give the users of your software the ability to script it. (Just think of scripts in MS Office/OpenOffice, or the scripting languages that come with many text editors). Now in 2015, do you really want to invent a new scripting language? Of course you don't. You'd use JavaScript--that's what your users know. And the scripting API makes it really easy for you to process user scripts that manipulate the objects in your application.

As for annotations, that's another underappreciate aspect of Java. As any user of modern JavaEE knows, they have dramatically changed how you approach what used to be a scary framework. And yes, I cover both use and creation of annotations. There are a couple of nifty annotation processing examples in the book.

And internationalization is certainly a hugely important part of Core Java, and it has a chapter in the book--one of my favorites. The Java i18n library is now 15 years old, but it has held up remarkably well. I recently had the misfortune of having to internationalize a JavaScript program, and it made me cry. Java developers are lucky.

Cheers,

Cay

 
Shiva Gajjala
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Thanks a lot Cay for your patient reply.I would definitely like to read your book
 
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