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What Should I learn next? Hybris, Spring, RESTful Web Services, EJB Messaging, Angular JS?

 
Greenhorn
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I am trying to figure out what I need to learn next that would benefit my career, I have worked on Struts most part of the last 7 years as well as spring. Building web applications for different clients.

Can any one point out what is hot and will be marketable in the next year or 2.

Here is my short list of technologies I am interested in.

Hybris
Spring
Web Services
EJB
Angular JS

Any guidance would be appreciated.



 
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Welcome to CodeRanch!

I hadn't heard of Hybris, so I googled it. It sounds like a niche product. Not to say learning it is bad, but I think the others in your list will help you more. Do you already know jQuery? I think it is more used than Angular JS.

From your list, I'd pick Spring first. It has broad use.
 
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Why not learn a new language instead, like Scala, Ruby or Clojure? Knowing a functional language is more likely to benefit your current coding, and looks good on a CV.

AngularJS, or just JS in general, is good as you can do web stuff but it's risky as the frameworks space is rapidly shifting still. Then again, if you're learning to build web services you could learn AngularJS to put on the front end.

Spring seems to be everywhere so is certainly good to have on the CV, although I dislike Spring personally.

 
Zaabit Shaikh
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My current project has Spring and AngularJS so I am sure I will know more when I sit down and start coding on new functional areas.

As for Scala, Ruby or Clojure, I have spent 2 weeks in learning and knowing Scala but its hard for me to see where it will benefit for the type of work I do, for Web Application development. Functional programming would benefit engineering type companies where you have to resolve complex coding projects. I could be wrong in my assessment but I think merging different technologies would be interesting which i see in Hybris.

Especially java integrating J2ee with SAP thats what got me excited learning something new and different and still be able to use the existing skills of java.

 
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Zaabit Shaikh wrote:

As for Scala, Ruby or Clojure, I have spent 2 weeks in learning and knowing Scala but its hard for me to see where it will benefit for the type of work I do, for Web Application development. Functional programming would benefit engineering type companies where you have to resolve complex coding projects. I could be wrong in my assessment but I think merging different technologies would be interesting which i see in Hybris.

Especially java integrating J2ee with SAP thats what got me excited learning something new and different and still be able to use the existing skills of java.



When you target the web, you need to have scalability which is pretty easy to do with functional programming idiom. I would doubt that functional programming would benefit only complex projects. I have been doing Java EE programming for almost a decade and ever since I started using Scala and its associated tooling, I cannot see myself going back to Java EE.
 
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Angular + Spring should be fun to explore. But I'd echo Joe's point that Scala is certainly not just for complex engineering applications (incidentally, you can use Java libraries in Scala and vice versa), although it will certainly take you more than a couple of weeks to learn enough Scala to be useful!

I attended the London Scala Exchange conference in December. Here's one of the things I mentioned in my own blog about the conference:


Scaling down with Scala

One feature of a number of talks was the focus on using Scala for relatively low-end applications. We've seen plenty of talk about the benefits of using Scala for large scale concurrency and Big Data, but it was refreshing to hear about people who are using it for smaller applications:

  • Rebeca Grenier talked about her experience at ""Eating Well" magazine in Vermont, where they replaced a traditional CMS (PHP, MySQL, Drupal) with the Typesafe stack (Scala Play etc) using Slick for database access.
  • Gary Higham described how BBC Children's websites are being moved from a PHP-based platform to Scala and Play, with a small team of developers who'd never worked with Scala (or even Java in most cases).
  • Peter Hilton (who co-wrote Play For Scala) presented a couple of case studies on using Play for rapidly implementing internal web applications for clients in the Netherlands, taking a pragmatic approach of selecting the easiest default options wherever possible e.g. no fancy JavaScript front-end, DB access with Slick, regular Play MVC approach etc.

  • I think this is an interesting potential niche for Scala i.e. for applications that might benefit from the stability and flexibility of the JVM platform, but where traditional Java EE would be massive overkill. Of course, there are other JVM-based tools that might offer this flexibility e.g. Grails, but Play offers a combination of reasonably easy implementation (if you stick to the happy path as Peter Hilton suggests) with a robust and scalable platform.


    Right now I'm working on some prototype code using Play for Scala, and I would have to agree that Scala/Play is not yet as easy to work with as Ruby/Rails, Groovy/Grails, Python/Django etc. Your combination of Angular plus Spring might well be more suitable for mainstream Java development right now. But I think Scala is becoming more accessible and (potentially) useful for mainstream applications.
     
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