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Can I become a professional programmer by only learning Java?

 
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Hi.
My background is electrical engineering. But I have decided to become a professional computer programmer. Currently I am focusing on Java programming language, and I am aiming to learn it inside out. I know that mastering Java language will take some time. Since I am already graduated from electrical engineering, I don't have much time to learn other programming languages.

Can I become a full time professional programmer by learning only the Java programming language? Will I be able to make a living by only having Java skills.
 
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No. Even for a "Java" job, you usually expected to know SQL, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, UNIX shell scripting. Not to mention that in your career, you'll need to work with other languages too.

I think the real question is what do you need to know to get you first programming job. And even that is more than just Java.
 
Mohammad Nizam Uddin
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:I think the real question is what do you need to know to get you first programming job. And even that is more than just Java.



Please can you kindly tell me what I need to know to get my first programming job?
 
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That depends what your first job will be. When you're looking for a job the adverts will likely list the expected skills.

It also depends what sort of level you're expecting to get. When I went for a graduate position 10 years ago the company did not care what language I knew, just that I had some programming ability and had the ability to adapt and learn.

However if you want a more senior role then you will need more specific skills relevant to whatever it is the company will want you to do.
 
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I think I had already mentioned that I was looking for a Java programming career. Therefore please tell me, what else I must know in order to get a "Java" programming job.
 
Mike. J. Thompson
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And the answer is still that it depends on what your company will do. Java is just a programming language, not all 'Java jobs' are the same.
 
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Mohammad Nizam Uddin wrote:I think I had already mentioned that I was looking for a Java programming career. Therefore please tell me, what else I must know in order to get a "Java" programming job.


You mean a first Java job. There is no such thing as a career in one language.

I still think you are going to know all/most of these:

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:No. Even for a "Java" job, you usually expected to know SQL, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, UNIX shell scripting..

 
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Indeed, I'd go as far as to say "Java job" is a misnomer. There's no job on Earth that is to "write Java". Jobs exist to create products and services. Java may be one tool used to achieve that goal.
 
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Bear Bibeault wrote:Indeed, I'd go as far as to say "Java job" is a misnomer. There's no job on Earth that is to "write Java". Jobs exist to create products and services. Java may be one tool used to achieve that goal.


Agreed. I use "java" job in quotes. I think of it is a job where the primary language is Java. Although when I look back on the past month, I did write more Java than anything else. But Groovy is a pretty close second.
 
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So this means that I will have to learn Java, C, C++, CSS, HTML, Javascript and many other languages in order to become a full time professional computer programmer. Am I right?
 
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I have rarely ever used C (although some in my company use it all the time). I don't use HTML or CSS (although I know the basics). I have used C++ in the last 4 months, but its not something I use every day. My main languages are Java and Python.

But if you ask other people on here you will probably get different answers from everyone. You will need to learn whatever languages the company you work for uses, and learn to use whatever tools they use.

 
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Mohammad Nizam Uddin wrote:So this means that I will have to learn Java, C, C++, CSS, HTML, Javascript and many other languages in order to become a full time professional computer programmer. Am I right?


Eventually. Over the course of your career. I don't think you need to know Java, C and C++ to start out. One of those is fine.
 
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Eventually. Over the course of your career. I don't think you need to know Java, C and C++ to start out. One of those is fine.


This means that I need to learn java along with html, css, javascript, jquery etc. But I don't need to learn C, C++ at the same time. Am I right?
 
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Yes.

Disclaimer: This is true for some subset of jobs. Other jobs will expect you to know Java + some other language. You can find out what companies in your area expect by looking at job listings for entry level or junior developers.
 
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You shouldn't throw away an EE education. Why not learn C and write device drivers and code for hardware? Or maybe industrial instrumentation development. The html. css. and javascript are exclusively for creating websites. If you're lucky you might get a job doing just website back ends and not have to know a lot of javascript, etc. Surely you wrote some C firmware in classes? There are equivalent classes to that on EDx and Coursera. Also on there there I think I have noticed at least one introductory class to programming that uses java. They usually use python, it seems like. There are a couple of classes in website design, usually where you write a blog program from scratch, which teaches a lot of the elements you need to know to get moving. I think classes are best for learning from nothing, partly because of the pace and having an experienced instructor. Most of the people I've met who do html and css professionally have art or other non-technical backgrounds. That might just be my experience though.
 
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Guillermo Ishi wrote:You shouldn't throw away an EE education. Why not learn C and write device drivers and code for hardware? Or maybe industrial instrumentation development. The html. css. and javascript are exclusively for creating websites. If you're lucky you might get a job doing just website back ends and not have to know a lot of javascript, etc. Surely you wrote some C firmware in classes? There are equivalent classes to that on EDx and Coursera. Also on there there I think I have noticed at least one introductory class to programming that uses java. They usually use python, it seems like. There are a couple of classes in website design, usually where you write a blog program from scratch, which teaches a lot of the elements you need to know to get moving. I think classes are best for learning from nothing, partly because of the pace and having an experienced instructor. Most of the people I've met who do html and css professionally have art or other non-technical backgrounds. That might just be my experience though.



Actually I attended a basic microcontroller course. But I thought working with hardware is a bit difficult. You need to buy necessary hardware, parts, electronic components etc. I remember buying some gas sensors to build an environment monitoring system. But then I realized that I would have to do sensor calibration for the sensors to give accurate value. But doing sensor calibration needs special environment and industrial facility that I cannot afford. Some sensors need to be preheated for 24 hours to give any reading at all. To do that I will have to buy a dc power supply unit that is not cheap either. Overall, working with hardware programming has its drawbacks.

On the other hand, I thought working with software is much easier as you need to know only programming. You don't need to buy a bulk of components for different projects, there is no chance of any parts requiring calibration. All you need is a computer and internet connection.

Therefore, I have decided to become a software developer.
 
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Mohammad Nizam Uddin wrote:
Therefore, I have decided to become a software developer.


Your employer would cover all those costs and he'd hire you to work on the stuff. If you want to go into business for yourself, yes, software could be less expensive to get started with. Might take a long time to get going. Keep your eyes open to all opportunities.
 
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