• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

What might be the best option in place of MS ACCESS?  RSS feed

 
Rod Hittle
Ranch Hand
Posts: 35
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As I have discovered JAVA 8 does not play will with MS ACCESS. As I am just starting out I am not tied to MS ACCESS. From what I have googled and read I am thinking maybe MySQL or even the free but limited version of Microsoft's SQL Server. Both I have read are free. I just want to make sure that JAVA 8 will work with whatever choice I make. Beyond that, my use would only be for learning. So my use would be tiny.
 
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal
Posts: 66304
152
IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A pad of paper and a pencil would be an improvement over Access.

MySQL and PostgreSQL are common fine and free choices.
 
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff
Posts: 23295
125
C++ Chrome Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser Java jQuery Linux VI Editor Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Also, all the commercial databases, Oracle, DB2, SQLServer, etc., seems to have free express editions, for very limited use only. This may be an option, if you are looking to learn the commercial products*.

Henry

* make sure that you review the fine print !!
 
Liutauras Vilda
Sheriff
Posts: 4917
334
BSD
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And you could find a good books (<- link) related to your topic in JavaRanch bunkhouse, where JavaRanch staff as a tip reviews them, and provide an overview about the content.

You'll need to pick the category to look for a book.
 
Darryl Burke
Bartender
Posts: 5167
11
Java Netbeans IDE Opera
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
JavaDB (earlier known as Apache Derby) comes bundled with the JDK. I've been using it for the last several months for a small (7 tables, none of which will ever have more than around 3000 records) personal project.

When I want to handle the data more directly, I use SQuirreL SQL Client, which is free.
 
Rod Hittle
Ranch Hand
Posts: 35
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am trying out MySQL mostly because I have the JAVA all in one for Dummies. Which gives examples using MySQL. Later I may use ORACLE.
 
J. Kevin Robbins
Bartender
Posts: 1801
28
Chrome Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser jQuery Linux MySQL Database Netbeans IDE
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Whenever MySQL is mentioned, I like to remind people of MariaDB. It's a fork of MySQL, by the original creator of same. He created it after selling MySQL to Oracle.

More information here

We're switching from Oracle to MariaDB across our plants.
 
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 18789
74
Android Eclipse IDE Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
MS Access doesn't play well with any version of Java. Its biggest problem (outside of its limited data capacity) is that it's not designed to be used in a multi-user environment such as a web application. And the only JDBC driver that I know of for it is the lowest-common-denominator ODBC-JDBC bridge driver. which not only doesn't play well in the multi-user space but isn't known for being high performance.

Since the preferred way to talk to SQL relational databases is JDBC, you can be pretty comfortable with any of them. MySQL/MariaDB is perhaps the easiest one to find general public support on, but most JDBC-compatible DBMSs are easy to talk to in Java.

Among the ones I've done JBC with are:

Oracle
IBM DB2*
MySQL/MariaDB*
PostgreSQL*
sqlite**
Microsoft SQL Server
Apache Derby*

The starred ones are live production servers I deal with everyday. SQLite tends to be more of an undercover thing, but it's the embedded DBMS in Android devices as well as a popular "invisible" DBMS for Linux apps. For example, I have a recipe filer system that runs SQLite undercover.

Most of the "real" DBMS's require a continuously-running stand-alone database server listening on tcp/ip ports. But not all. SQLite is typically embedded within the app. Apache Derby can be run either way.
 
Rod Hittle
Ranch Hand
Posts: 35
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For Oracle, is the 'Oracle 11g Express Edition' the thing I would want?
Would it include the PL/SQL?
 
Tapas Chand
Ranch Hand
Posts: 614
9
BSD Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes you are good to go with Oracle 11g express edition.
Pl/Sql is there in all databases.
It is just the syntax may vary from database to database which is not an issue.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!