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Difference between SOA and client-Server model.  RSS feed

 
Monica Shiralkar
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In client server model we have a client and we have a server which makes use of this client. In SOA too the client makes use of the model. What is the difference between SOA and client server model.

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William Brogden
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In my highly cynical opinion - not much.

In the computing world we are constantly exposed to streams of buzz words by people trying to push their own careers / products / lecture series.

Bill
 
Joe Bishara
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They are practically the same; however, SOA is an evolution. The traditional client–server model (2-tier) is a basic architectural pattern in which one component (a client) requests a service from another component (a server) over a network. Over the years, this basic architectural pattern has evolved into more advanced architectural patterns like SOA, peer-to-peer, 3-tier, MVC etc.

One difference is centralization. In the traditional client–server model, the server is a centralized system that serves many clients. The bulk of the computing power resides in a centralized server that is attached to terminals (clients). In a service oriented architecture, components are more decentralized. Components are more equal in the sense that one is not subordinate to the other, for example, the client and server can swap roles in order to achieve an objective. Components can operate independently but are capable of interacting with each other in order to achieve an objective.

Another difference is coupling. In the traditional client–server model, the client is typically tightly coupled to the server. In a service oriented architecture, a component exposes a service so that the service can be discovered and invoked. The component exposes the service in a way that is independent of its implementation (via an interface like WSDL or WADL). Other components that understand the interface can invoke the service via the interface without being tightly coupled to its implementation. A developer can build an application which uses one or more services without knowing about their underlying implementations, for example, a Java application can use a service implemented in C++ and another service implemented in Ruby.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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thanks
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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