• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Starting Backend Java Web Services, what to learn?

 
Tom Nielson
Ranch Hand
Posts: 53
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

I've been developing Java business applications with JavaFX and Swing for awhile, and I never really did anything web or network-related other than connecting with JDBC's. But I want to learn how to create web servers and ultimately get into corporate security and pen-testing. After some research I think the route I'm going down is learning servlets with Tomcat and JSP. I bought the "Head First Servlets & JSP" book. I've finished 50 pages and I'm fascinated by it.

However, the book is 7 years old and I want to ask if its still just as relevant. Are these the technologies I should start with for my career goals above? Or are there more current technologies I should chase? I'm getting the impression Tomcat and Java are pretty universal tools nowadays for backend web development, and I heard even big companies like Amazon rely on it heavily.
 
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal
Posts: 65519
105
IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you are going to be using JSPs you need to know up-front that Java scriptlets from JSP 1.x (Java code in JSPs) has not been acceptable since the introduction of JSP 2.x in 2002. Many books still teach the old way so that legacy code can be dealt with, but be aware that modern newly-written JSPs should have no Java code in them.

I always recommend novices to servlets and JSP read the following articles
  • The Secret Life of JSPs
  • The Front Man

  •  
    Tom Nielson
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 53
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Bear Bibeault wrote:If you are going to be using JSPs you need to know up-front that Java scriptlets from JSP 1.x (Java code in JSPs) has not been acceptable since the introduction of JSP 2.x in 2002. Many books still teach the old way so that legacy code can be dealt with, but be aware that modern newly-written JSPs should have no Java code in them.

    I always recommend novices to servlets and JSP read the following articles
  • The Secret Life of JSPs
  • The Front Man



  • " newly-written JSPs should have no Java code in them." Okay, that's significant. I fast forwarded through the book and I found it addresses both JSP 1.x and JSP 2.x. Thanks for the heads up, and I'll read those articles too.
     
    Bear Bibeault
    Author and ninkuma
    Marshal
    Posts: 65519
    105
    IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator


    If you are going to be writing web apps, rather than just back-end services, you'll also need to learn HTML, JavaScript and CSS.

    For services that have no HTML views, you likely won't need JSP.
     
    Tom Nielson
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 53
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Bear Bibeault wrote:

    If you are going to be writing web apps, rather than just back-end services, you'll also need to learn HTML, JavaScript and CSS.

    For services that have no HTML views, you likely won't need JSP.


    Fortunately I know a decent amount of HTML/CSS and a little bit of Javascript. I can pull off static frontend web stuff. I tried to learn PHP at one point but disliked it.

    And what kind of services are you referring to that are non-HTML? Like transmitting JSON data to mobile apps?
     
    Bear Bibeault
    Author and ninkuma
    Marshal
    Posts: 65519
    105
    IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Yeas, that's generally what one means by "services' as oppose to "web apps".
     
    Tom Nielson
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 53
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Bear Bibeault wrote:Yeas, that's generally what one means by "services' as oppose to "web apps".


    Of course. I was wondering if Tomcat would handle web service tasks which I'd probably be more interested in anyway.
     
    Bear Bibeault
    Author and ninkuma
    Marshal
    Posts: 65519
    105
    IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Tomcat fully supports servlets and JSP, so yes.
     
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!