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Is JavaFX the up and coming framework?

 
Campbell Ritchie
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Here I was last week, here, telling somebody to learn JavaFX rather than Swing, and I had somebody disagree with me. I didn't press it in case I misled the rest of the people on the thread.

But is JavaFX the next up and coming big thing, or was Brett Spell right that JavaFX never got off the ground?
 
Greg Charles
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The general consensus seems to be, yes, JavaFX is replacing Swing, although Swing will continue to be supported, and seems to be inter-operable with JavaFX. However, the interest in developing rich clients in Java is small, so it makes the fight pretty low profile. The possible exception is Android apps, but I don't think Swing is even an option for those.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Thanks. You can't use Swing on Android, can you.
 
Rob Spoor
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Neither Swing nor JavaFX is part of the Android API, which you can find at https://developer.android.com/reference/packages.html. I don't know if it's possible to include either in Android, as the way Android handles events et all is quite different.
 
Greg Charles
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What I don't know about Android would fill ... well, a book about Android. However I see some nascent attempts to get JavaFx apps running on Android, e.g., this article. I haven't seen anything similar for Swing.
 
Herb Schildt
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Hi Campbell,

In my view, to be a professional Java programmer, it is important to know both Swing and JavaFX. There are, obviously, many lines of Swing code in use. So knowledge of Swing is currently quite helpful. But, to me, JavaFX points to the future.

BTW: For the above reasons, I expect to be writing about both Swing and JavaFX for a long while.
 
Rob Spoor
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Herb Schildt wrote:In my view, to be a professional Java programmer, it is important to know both Swing and JavaFX.

If you mean "to be a professional Java GUI programmer", then perhaps. However, for web applications, I don't think you need to know either.
 
Herb Schildt
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Hi Rob,

I understand your point, but I stand by what I said. For today's highly graphical computing environment, I see GUI programming as a fundamental skill. Something that is part and parcel of being a programmer. Thus, I think that all programmers need at least passing knowledge of the essentials of GUI programming. For Java, that means Swing and JavaFX.
 
Bear Bibeault
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I've been using Java for web applications since 1998, and have never had any reason to use AWT, Swing, or JavaFX.

But I understand what you are saying, Herbert: I cut my UI teeth on X Windows programming, as well as Windows desktop programming (16 and 32 bit). Understanding how such GUIs work is a fundamental concept every programmer should have knowledge of (even if it's not in Java).
 
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