Win a copy of The Little Book of Impediments (e-book only) this week in the Agile and Other Processes forum!
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

OT - Hinglesh and Incorrect Grammar

 
James Brannan
Greenhorn
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, I knew outsourcing and H1B had risen to new levels, but I was shocked at the wording of Oracle's exam questions. It was clearly written by non-native speakers and even had grammatical errors! The meaning of several questions were actually obfuscated due to the sentences being so poorly written. The exam wasn't in English, but rather, Hinglesh. It is a sad time in America when corporations have such little pride that they allow grammatical errors in certification exams. It's the same trend with technical books, where publishing companies have outsourced editing to Indian firms, and so grammatical errors and awkward sentences are allowed to remain. All in all, a very shocking experience taking the exam.
 
Paul Anilprem
Enthuware Software Support
Ranch Hand
Posts: 3819
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
James Brannan wrote:Wow, I knew outsourcing and H1B had risen to new levels, but I was shocked at the wording of Oracle's exam questions. It was clearly written by non-native speakers and even had grammatical errors! The meaning of several questions were actually obfuscated due to the sentences being so poorly written. The exam wasn't in English, but rather, Hinglesh. It is a sad time in America when corporations have such little pride that they allow grammatical errors in certification exams. It's the same trend with technical books, where publishing companies have outsourced editing to Indian firms, and so grammatical errors and awkward sentences are allowed to remain. All in all, a very shocking experience taking the exam.

And how do you know it was Hinglish and not Spanglish or Rusling
Jokes aside, I agree with you. Irrespective of who develops the questions, the editors should make sure there are no grammatical errors. Haven't heard about this problem in Oracle questions before though.
 
James Brannan
Greenhorn
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paul Anilprem wrote:
James Brannan wrote:Wow, I knew outsourcing and H1B had risen to new levels, but I was shocked at the wording of Oracle's exam questions. It was clearly written by non-native speakers and even had grammatical errors! The meaning of several questions were actually obfuscated due to the sentences being so poorly written. The exam wasn't in English, but rather, Hinglesh. It is a sad time in America when corporations have such little pride that they allow grammatical errors in certification exams. It's the same trend with technical books, where publishing companies have outsourced editing to Indian firms, and so grammatical errors and awkward sentences are allowed to remain. All in all, a very shocking experience taking the exam.

And how do you know it was Hinglish and not Spanglish or Rusling
Jokes aside, I agree with you. Irrespective of who develops the questions, the editors should make sure there are no grammatical errors. Haven't heard about this problem in Oracle questions before though.

Good point. Yes, I agree, I cannot assume it was Hinglish. It was not glaring errors, but more subtle ones. Quite a few questions with awkward wording. But clearly, IMHO, several questions were written by non-native speakers. That being said, I would make a terrible author of a test written in Hindi, Tamil, Spanish, or French test, but then, I wasn't hired by arguably the largest IT company in the world to write a test either.
 
James Brannan
Greenhorn
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
BTW...I flunked :-) But I always seem to flunk the first time and then pass with about 80% the second time, after I learn what I omitted from my studies. The wording WAS NOT the reason for the flunking.

James Brannan wrote:
Paul Anilprem wrote:
James Brannan wrote:Wow, I knew outsourcing and H1B had risen to new levels, but I was shocked at the wording of Oracle's exam questions. It was clearly written by non-native speakers and even had grammatical errors! The meaning of several questions were actually obfuscated due to the sentences being so poorly written. The exam wasn't in English, but rather, Hinglesh. It is a sad time in America when corporations have such little pride that they allow grammatical errors in certification exams. It's the same trend with technical books, where publishing companies have outsourced editing to Indian firms, and so grammatical errors and awkward sentences are allowed to remain. All in all, a very shocking experience taking the exam.

And how do you know it was Hinglish and not Spanglish or Rusling
Jokes aside, I agree with you. Irrespective of who develops the questions, the editors should make sure there are no grammatical errors. Haven't heard about this problem in Oracle questions before though.

Good point. Yes, I agree, I cannot assume it was Hinglish. It was not glaring errors, but more subtle ones. Quite a few questions with awkward wording. But clearly, IMHO, several questions were written by non-native speakers. That being said, I would make a terrible author of a test written in Hindi, Tamil, Spanish, or French test, but then, I wasn't hired by arguably the largest IT company in the world to write a test either.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic