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Designing Primefaces Applications

 
Partheban Udayakumar
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Hi,

I am developing an application with Primefaces. I see many of our designers working with ease in many other frameworks(like spring) but when it comes to primefaces, they don't want to design it. Is it really that hard to design a primefaces application. If someone has experience in designing primefaces app with ease, Please provide us with some tips, tricks or tweaks in designing such applications.
 
K. Tsang
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Primefaces is an extension to JSF. So your app is really JSF with special tags (from primefaces).

The bad thing about JSF is that you can't view/run the page without the app server because the browser can't render the jsf tags like html.

Another reason is primefaces has its own set of css. Overriding them can be a pain/troublesome.

Apart from that JSF in general is good in my opinion.
 
Tim Holloway
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K. Tsang wrote:Primefaces is an extension to JSF.


Literally. JSF comes with a set of core tags (the "h" and "f" namespaces). Extension tagsets such as PrimeFaces, RichFaces, Apache Tomahawk, IceFaces and so forth add additional tagsets with functions such as scrollable tables, dropdown combobox controls, calendar controls and more.

JSF is a standard part of every JEE-compliant webapp server. For webapp servers such as Tomcat that don't implement the full JEE stack, you can add JSF jars to the WAR to give them JSF capabilities.

JSF is not an ideal solution for every problem, but then it doesn't try to be. You can mix JSF and non-JSF functions in a webapp with no problems. JSF works best when you're dealing with input forms where you want lots of messages and data validations and you don't want to have to code all the trivial little details. JSF provides an almost 100% pure Model/View/Controller framework where the Controllers are already pre-written and pre-debugged for you and you never have to go fetch data from webpages, because JSF feeds it to you automatically (Inversion of Control). Plus, the built-in validation capabilities ensure that you don't ever get handed incomplete or defective sets of data.

There's no decent WYSIWYG designer for JSF, but then really, there's no decent WYSIWYG designer for any extended HTML framework. It's not as bad as it seems though.
 
Partheban Udayakumar
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K. Tsang wrote:Another reason is primefaces has its own set of css. Overriding them can be a pain/troublesome.

Yes that is the reason why i posted this question here.
Tim Holloway wrote:There's no decent WYSIWYG designer for JSF, but then really, there's no decent WYSIWYG designer for any extended HTML framework. It's not as bad as it seems though.

The problem is, as I have stated, our designers are struggling to handle primefaces. If you can give some general tweaks you know it would be helpful to us.
 
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