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Ted Schrey
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I have always been a Windows user. am am still learning to program. I'd say I'm at the end of being a "beginner" but still a relative newbie. I've gotten most Core Java and some GUI and am now also studying Android. So, although I want to develop Apps at some point, I have a ways to go. With that said, I need a new computer very soon and want one that will carry me through a good number of years of programming. I'm thinking of Apple this time, though I am not sure if in the next few years I'll have any Apps ready in Android that I want to then have in OIs (will have to learn that too!). For the price, it looks like I can purchase more speed from a PC, (around $2K max for me!), but I always hear such good things about Mac. I like Netbeans better than Eclipse, though use both, and also Android Studio, which I'll probably be using for all my Android work. Can any of you Mac folks (preferably who have used both systems) tell me why you are Mac folks rather than PC users?
 
L Foster
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I got into Macs, purely and simply, because they were mandated at my job. That said, I have very little bad to say about them. Having used Windows for decades prior, it took a lot of getting used to. There are subtle differences in the user interface (the one I miss the most is the way "home" is handled on Windows). Also, the "window controls" for collapsing, etc., are on the opposite side, etc.

On the brighter side, I have been told I am eligible to get a new laptop, and I have not felt that the 4-yo one I have is underpowered. I have run Graphics, JEE/Servlet applications, Java command-line apps, etc., on the Mac (MacBook Pro laptop, MacPro workstation), successfully. Nothing in Java has failed (although do NOT expect JOGL to work exactly the same as on Windows). You do need to be picky about which JVM--get the one from Oracle. I have had bad luck with Windows-based laptop power connectors. Connectors are brilliantly done on Macs. Macs look good (but, who cares, IMHO). I do hear from lots of Mac-o-philes, that they have good longevity.

On the not-so-bright side, for good or bad, Windows is the preferred market for game programmers, and that means (among other things) graphics software and boards. Mac has been catching up, but over the past few years, it has been more expensive, and you had fewer options, to buy comparable graphics hardware at the mid-range of power. The OpenGL standard has lagged (it has been catching up, lately, but I have read that even 'El Capitan' is still not beyond 4.1, which was released in 2010). Macs are more expensive, and you seem to be paying in part for things you might not care about. Another thing I really dislike about macs--the closed ecosystem. There may be more crap-ware available for Windows, but a lot of the best-of-breed does not make it to the iOS world (case in point: Enterprise Architect--Wine proved a royal pain). You always CAN find an alternative, however.

I also like being able to port skills between Linux and Mac--they have a lot of similarities, owing to common Unix roots.
 
Joe Ess
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There are a couple of discussions of this nature in our forum, for example: this one on the first page.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Already said my piece there, not gonna repeat it. But what it comes down to is use the tool that you feel will suit you best. For me, it's OS X hands down.
 
Ted Schrey
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I appreciate your input.... it is very informative and helpful Bear Bibeault! Thanks
 
Ted Schrey
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...and Joe Ess, that link contains a lot of good info... thank you.
 
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