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Confusion about iText "licensing"

 
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I have Bruno's excellent "iText in Action" book from 2007 when it states that iText is a free and open source library.

However today, there is an iText Web site that is charging lots (> $1,000) for a license.

Therefore, I'm wondering if now, in 2016 if iText is still free in the same sense as it was in 2007.

Are iText licenses now expected/required or am I misinterpreting this?

The latest iText in Action book I saw on Amazon was from 2010.

Thanks,

-mike
 
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According to the iText Pricing page it is free as long as your application is open source. As soon as you want to use it in a closed source application then you need a commercial licence for which you have to apply for a quote. The site doesn't list any commercial licence prices.

What iText website are you referring to that's charging $1000's?
 
Mike London
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Tim Cooke wrote:According to the iText Pricing page it is free as long as your application is open source. As soon as you want to use it in a closed source application then you need a commercial licence for which you have to apply for a quote. The site doesn't list any commercial licence prices.

What iText website are you referring to that's charging $1000's?



http://itextpdf.com/Pricing/unit-based

- mike
 
Tim Cooke
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So usage in an open source product is free, and usage in a closed source product is costly.

It appears that iText is still a free and open source library as your 2007 book suggests.
 
Mike London
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Tim Cooke wrote:So usage in an open source product is free, and usage in a closed source product is costly.

It appears that iText is still a free and open source library as your 2007 book suggests.



So, that means if I write an application for a paying customer (closed) or put iText on a web service or something (not open source), I'm going to be having to find my credit card now?

Yikes!!!

If this is correct, I can't believe this happened to iText.

I haven't used it in a while, but I have very fond memories of iText being one of the best libs around.

- mike
 
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IText 2 was and is available to use for free under the LGPL. IText 5 uses the Affero GPL which makes it a nonstarter for most business uses, thus requiring you to pay for a license.

For me, IText 2 did everything I ever needed to do when generating PDF, so I saw no need to switch to IText 5.

Note that edition 1 of iText in Action is about iText 2, whereas edition 2 is about iText 5.
 
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Tim Moores wrote:IText 2 was and is available to use for free under the LGPL. IText 5 uses the Affero GPL which makes it a nonstarter for most business uses, thus requiring you to pay for a license.

For me, IText 2 did everything I ever needed to do when generating PDF, so I saw no need to switch to IText 5.

Note that edition 1 of iText in Action is about iText 2, whereas edition 2 is about iText 5.



Very good information, thanks!

Will file this away for the next time I use iText.

Thanks,

- mike
 
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If you're writing closed source applications for paying customers then the cost of iText (or any other paid library you choose) will become part of the price. That's just good budgeting.

Whether this premium for closed source usage is something new for iText I couldn't say. I haven been monitoring their pricing scheme for the last decade. It is a fairly common business structure for open source libraries now though, where they offer their product for free with an open source licence and then offer paid support for commercial users. For example the Linux distribution Ubuntu is free but you have the option of paid support from Canonical.
 
Mike London
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Tim Cooke wrote:If you're writing closed source applications for paying customers then the cost of iText (or any other paid library you choose) will become part of the price. That's just good budgeting.

Whether this premium for closed source usage is something new for iText I couldn't say. I haven been monitoring their pricing scheme for the last decade. It is a fairly common business structure for open source libraries now though, where they offer their product for free with an open source licence and then offer paid support for commercial users. For example the Linux distribution Ubuntu is free but you have the option of paid support from Canonical.



Check, thanks.
 
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