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HTTP Binding in TOMCAT  RSS feed

 
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Hello,
I'm new here but I have an urgent question..

I am trying to run CandyChat at a TOMCAT server. But CandyChat Requires HTTP-Binding.
EX. from htaccess
In the javascript used it looks like this:

Is there any way to fix it? I really need it Urgent..


Kind regards,
Koen
 
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Welcome to the JavaRanch, Koen! I should warn you that since no one here gets paid to do this, people check in whenever it's convenient for them, so we are not a good resource for truly urgent needs.

I'm not sure where you get your definition of "http binding". Your URL indicates that you're expecting it to be routed to a web application registered under the context path of "http-bind", but that's not something that comes with Tomcat, nor is such a thing known to me. In Enterprise Java, "http binding" is most often used to refer to a mapping between URLs and backend processing for things like SOAP or ReST where a controller servlet is usually acting as a dispatcher.

CandyChat isn't intended to run on a J2EE/JEE server. It's supposed to run on an XMPP (Jabber) server. You could embed something like Apache Vysper into a JEE webapp, but the actual Vysper services wouldn't be coming through Tomcat, regardless. Vysper would open its own ports independent of the Tomcat ports and the client-side code would talk to them.
 
Koen Nolmans
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Tim Holloway wrote:Welcome to the JavaRanch, Koen! I should warn you that since no one here gets paid to do this, people check in whenever it's convenient for them, so we are not a good resource for truly urgent needs.

I'm not sure where you get your definition of "http binding". Your URL indicates that you're expecting it to be routed to a web application registered under the context path of "http-bind", but that's not something that comes with Tomcat, nor is such a thing known to me. In Enterprise Java, "http binding" is most often used to refer to a mapping between URLs and backend processing for things like SOAP or ReST where a controller servlet is usually acting as a dispatcher.

CandyChat isn't intended to run on a J2EE/JEE server. It's supposed to run on an XMPP (Jabber) server. You could embed something like Apache Vysper into a JEE webapp, but the actual Vysper services wouldn't be coming through Tomcat, regardless. Vysper would open its own ports independent of the Tomcat ports and the client-side code would talk to them.



Thank you for your response. Well than I have to look for another chat application which I can run at a Tomcat server.. Any suggestions? been busting my ass off looking around the internet but could not find any good application..
 
Tim Holloway
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JEE (Tomcat) isn't really a good platform for chat apps. Originally, HTTP was strictly request/response, which meant that clients would have to repeatedly poll the server, whether there was new traffic or not. That can result in an awful lot of wasted resources as the number of users scales up.

You can reduce that in Tomcat 8 and up because of the websocket enhancements, but that does require an open connection for each client, I believe. And the clients have to be websocket-capable, which older clients may not be.

The alternative is to use a true XMPP server. CandyChat is designed to allow you to use a web browser as a client for such a server. Plus many Instant Messaging client apps and applets also can work with XMPP servers, since, like HTTP, there's a standard for XMPP.
 
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