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Learning Java on Linux (Debian) - what to install?  RSS feed

 
Juha Aaltonen
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Hi. I'm an experienced (mainly hardships) embedded programmer wishing to learn Java upto enterprise level. My Java knowledge is still quite elementary, but I wish to start learning Java EE programming (too).
I think it would be more like a continuation of what I've been doing this far, and I'm not into user interfaces - at least not for now.
What should I install on my (smallish and oldish) laptop to be able to learn? My laptop is "StinkBad" T400 with Debian 8.3.
I understand that JSP and servlets are the base, but how much EJB is used compared to the JSP and servlets? (= Should I leave EJB for now?)

I wish to make one environment for all Java learning or if "incremental" environment building is possible, it would be even better. It's just that I wish not to change what I've installed - that usually spells trouble.
And often installation of different pieces of SW needs to be done in a certain order so that the next installation can find the previous.

So what should I install? I understand that with Java EE environment, you can do plain Java SE programming too?
Java EE JDK, but what else? What kind of server(s)?
Should I start with tomcat? How about if/when it's time to try EJB? Or should I go for JBoss? Or what?
Is programming much different with different application servers, or is it so that if you've seen one, you've seen them all?

I'm just confused with all that and need some advice from the more experienced.
 
Les Morgan
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Let me see if I can rattle the cobwebs a bit:

I started out with the JDK and NetBeans. When I wanted to start web apps, I went with TomCat and Java Server Pages. NetBeans will give you an IDE that will allow you to expand into any aspect of Java programming you choose.
 
Juha Aaltonen
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How about EJB? I understand that Tomcat doesn't support EJB?
Or should EJB be considered as alternative or marginal?
 
Felipe Kunzler
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Just out of curiosity, what would be the benefits (real practical examples if possible) of developing Java EE on Linux instead of Windows? (Or vice-versa).
 
Les Morgan
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Often it is nothing more than what you have, or what platform you are currently working. I did my learning of J2EE on Solaris.

Felipe Kunzler wrote:Just out of curiosity, what would be the benefits (real practical examples if possible) of developing Java EE on Linux instead of Windows? (Or vice-versa).
 
Juha Aaltonen
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I guess Linux is more often used for servers, but in my case, the machine is my old work laptop (I also had a more current desktop) that I got to buy cheap from my employer when I got laid off.
The machine got wiped and the Windows license was, of course, owned by the company, and I really don't want to buy Windows.

(Actually, the laptop was so old I got it for free.)

I got it to be my "project machine".

 
Campbell Ritchie
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With the possible exception of Ubuntu, where there is a simplified method, the instructions for Linux installation are the same for all flavours. I suggest you should use the .tar.gz files because you can't use an .rpm. We have an FAQ, and there is a recent thread about installing Java on Linux. Instructions about installing JavaEE here. That link has tutorial links in, too.
 
Juha Aaltonen
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:With the possible exception of Ubuntu, where there is a simplified method, the instructions for Linux installation are the same for all flavours. I suggest you should use the .tar.gz files because you can't use an .rpm. We have an FAQ, and there is a recent thread about installing Java on Linux. Instructions about installing JavaEE here. That link has tutorial links in, too.


Thanks for the links.
Do you think GlassFish would be a good option?
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Don't know, sorry.

And, you're welcome
 
Juha Aaltonen
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It looks like EJB is more or less dormant, if not obsolete. Is that the general opinion?
And in most cases Tomcat is quite enough?
 
Juha Aaltonen
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I decided to try out with Tomcat.
This page makes it quite easy to try things.
https://netbeans.org/downloads/index.html
 
Winston Gutkowski
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Juha Aaltonen wrote:I decided to try out with Tomcat.

I don't quite know what you mean by "try out with Tomcat". Tomcat is a piece of software called a "servlet engine" (although I'd liken it more to a transmission), that lets you send and receive pre-defined "chunks" of HTML across a network; and it has the same sort of relationship to Java that a web server like IIS or Apache has to your web Browser - ie, not very much.

However, in answer to your question: If you're just interested in learning Java, don't worry about EJBs for the moment (and possibly never). They are generally a solution for large distributed systems and, as such, have many layers of indirection which will be very confusing while you're starting out, and are almost certainly overkill for anything you're likely to write for the next year or so.

Learn to walk first. Get really good at the basics - and for that, you probably don't even need Tomcat. Understand the language, and then - probably when it starts to get a bit boring - move on to things like web programming or databases (or both).

That's my advice. YMMV.

Winston
 
Juha Aaltonen
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By "trying" I mean seeing if it's enough for me for a while. That's basically what I was asking - do I need EJB, or maybe servlets and JSP are enough, and which server(s) would be recommended for an Java EE noobie.

I'm learning Java, but I'd rather do that in EE environment, because my aim is to become useful as a member of a team writing enterprise applications.
I've done a couple of basic courses of Java - with Swing, and those courses tend to teach more Swing than Java, and with the small toy programs one does not really learn about the Java SW architecture.

And even if I consider myself a noobie with Java, I would like to think that I'm somewhat experienced in SW engineering (20 to 30 years of C, C++, Forth and assembly depending on how it's counted).

 
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