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Cloud computing platform?  RSS feed

 
meenakshi sundar
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I presume when we say Webservice we are discussing about the cloud computing platform that Amazon is offering rather than the webservice technology/Implementation per se.
do you deep dive into Virtualization concepts as well in this?

Thanks
Sundar
 
Andreas Wittig
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Thanks for your question!

Amazon Web Services, is the cloud computing platform offered by AWS. Our book Amazon Web Services in Action covers the most important services: EC2, EBS, S3, DynamoDB, RDS, VPC, Auto Scaling, ...

What do you mean by "Virtualization concepts"? The hypervisor behind EC2?
 
Tim Holloway
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Incidentally, the Ranch has just opened a new forum dedicated to clouds (both public and private), VMs and containers.
 
meenakshi sundar
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Wow that's great to have a dedicated forum for Cloud computing, Thanks for the information Tim.

Andreas,

Yes i meant Hypervisor when i said 'virtualization', and i could notice that in your reply.


 
meenakshi sundar
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With the onset of openstack and growing acceptance for cloud computing ,do you think this is going to fundamentally change
the way traditional IT project development/Deployment/Management work and some skill becoming obsolete?

Thanks and Regards
Sundar
 
Tim Holloway
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From the development perspective, there's not a lot to become obsolete.

Cloud hosts are VMs spun up from pre-built images. So one wouldn't be doing a whole lot of OS installs. But for production machines, applications personnel generally aren't allowed to do OS installs anyway.

Applications developers mainly see the cloud as a way to make it easier to add hosts to a system. You can order up hosts as needed for scalability or to provide additional functionality for the system to tap into without having to do a possibly messy intermingling of services on an existing host.

Most of the advantages of clouds are to Operations and DevOps personnel. Apps people may need to be more savvy with the idea of connecting services on multiple hosts, and in some cases, working with virtual networks, but fundamental application design doesn't change that much.

Now, if you add in containers, that ramps things up a notch. You can (and I do) run containers in non-cloud machines, but containers are designed to be transportable and replicable. Whether the container host is a cloud VM, a straight VM or even a physical box - or for that matter - a mix of the precessing - matters not to the container. But while simple containers are very useful, they really begin to shine when you wire them together. That's when you can seriously talk micro-services as a commodity. Along with software-defined networking so that you aren't tied to a particular container host and so that systems can be kept better isolated while running in an environment where the number and location of service providers can be adjusted at will, and sometimes without any human intervention.

Again, a grunt-level applications programmer isn't directly impacted by most of this. This is what DevOps people are for. To design the provisioning of the various components and their wiring.
 
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