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I have question about "Core java 10th Edition" book and "Java SE 8 for the Really Impatient" book  RSS feed

 
Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim
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Hi everyone!
This is the first time i participate in the forum,
i have question and i wish the experts guide me.

If someone is beginner in Java (know some of the fundamentals of Java version 1.5) and want to study deeply, some of my friends told me about "Core Java 9th Edition" and after completing reading it start reading from "Java SE 8 for the Really Impatient" to get the new features of Java 8, but i found that "Core Java Volume I 10th Edition" is released.

which is better ?

Start directly reading from "Core java 10th Edition" ?
will this get me missed any features of Java 7 or prior ? as some friends told me that a lot of companies still work with Java 7 or even Java 6

Or

Start reading from "Core java 9th Edition" and then reading "Java SE 8 for the Really Impatient" to study Java 7 and the new features of Java 8 ?



Regards,
Mohamed.
 
Rajdeep Biswas
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Hi, welcome to the Ranch, Mohamed. In my opinion, you can start studying Java 8 because it will be different from previous versions, but most concepts will be carried from them only. If not for a specific reason, I don't see the need to study older versions. And yes, most of the Java production code is written heavily on JDK 1.6. So if you want to do it from an interview perspective, go for 1.6, then probably look at only the new features in JDK 1.7. But if you are thinking afresh, Java 8 and beyond might be the way to go, in my opinion.

Cheers.
 
Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim
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Rajdeep Biswas wrote:Hi, welcome to the Ranch, Mohamed. In my opinion, you can start studying Java 8 because it will be different from previous versions, but most concepts will be carried from them only. If not for a specific reason, I don't see the need to study older versions. And yes, most of the Java production code is written heavily on JDK 1.6. So if you want to do it from an interview perspective, go for 1.6, then probably look at only the new features in JDK 1.7. But if you are thinking afresh, Java 8 and beyond might be the way to go, in my opinion.

Cheers.


Thank you Rajdeep Biswas
 
Rob Spoor
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I'd definitely not go for Java 6. It has been EOL for quite some time now, so the number of companies still using it is should be decreasing. Even more important - if you learn Java 7 or Java 8, you can still read and write code for Java 6, as long as you don't use the new language features, classes and methods. So I'd just go for the latest version (8).
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Why not go the whole hog and download the trial versions of Java9?
 
Cay Horstmann
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I think it is a bad idea for a newcomer to relive history. There is no point in first learning cumbersome old stuff and then the better way. you should absolutely, positively go for learning Java 8. Both "Core Java" and "Core Java for the Impatient" teach you the new features first, because they are more powerful and easier to use. "Core Java" goes into more detail about the old features which you still need when working with old code. If you have a Safari subscription, check out both and see which you like better.

Cheers,

Cay
 
Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim
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Rob Spoor wrote:I'd definitely not go for Java 6. It has been EOL for quite some time now, so the number of companies still using it is should be decreasing. Even more important - if you learn Java 7 or Java 8, you can still read and write code for Java 6, as long as you don't use the new language features, classes and methods. So I'd just go for the latest version (8).


Thank you Rob for your Reply, i will start directly with java 8 as long as can still read and write code for older versions


Cheers.
 
Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim
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Cay Horstmann wrote:I think it is a bad idea for a newcomer to relive history. There is no point in first learning cumbersome old stuff and then the better way. You should absolutely, positively go for learning Java 8. Both "Core Java" and "Core Java for the Impatient" teach you the new features first, because they are more powerful and easier to use. "Core Java" goes into more detail about the old features which you still need when working with old code. If you have a Safari subscription, check out both and see which you like better.

Cheers,

Cay


Thank you Cay for your Reply, i will go for learning Java 8,
But i have question for you if you don't mind, I'm Sorry if the question might be silly

If i already bought the 9th edition Volume I and II before i know that 10th Edition is released, but i didn't yet start reading from it, can i start reading and then read "Java SE 8 for the Really Impatient" to get the Java 8 updates ? Or it is better to replace 9th Edition with 10th Edition ? Are the two ways same (10th Edition == 9th Edition+Java SE 8 for the Really Impatient) ?


Cheers,
 
Cay Horstmann
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The ideal plan, if money is no object, is to get started with the 10th edition. (Keep in mind that volume II won't be out until the Summer.) But you could read the 9th edition and then work through this free chapter: http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2303960

Cheers,

Cay
 
Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim
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Cay Horstmann wrote:The ideal plan, if money is no object, is to get started with the 10th edition. (Keep in mind that volume II won't be out until the Summer.) But you could read the 9th edition and then work through this free chapter: http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2303960

Cheers,

Cay


Thank you Cay for your Reply and Advice, Thank you so much.


Cheers,
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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