• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Question to Cay about changes since Java 5  RSS feed

 
Jason Wallwork
Greenhorn
Posts: 6
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Cay,

I took your Udacity course to first start learning Java and then migrated to the Head First Java book to learn more. I didn't know at the time that you had written other Java books (sorry!). Anyways, the Head First Java book covered Java 5. Obviously, I want to learn more about the latest Java 8. I'm so afraid I'm going to miss out on something in between 5 and 8.

Does your book cover things that have changed since Java 5 or just since Java 7?

Thanks so much your time!
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 56529
172
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome to the Ranch

If previous editions are anything to go by, no and no. The books have not covered changes; they are updated and expanded to cover the entire field of Java®, as far as possible.
 
Jason Wallwork
Greenhorn
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you, Campbell. Do you know of any good books that might fill in the details or should I just grab a Java 8 book like Cay's and go through it, ignoring the parts that I believe I've already covered in the Java 5 book?
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 56529
172
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's a pleasure
Start by seeing whether you win this book. There are several good Java8 books around, e.g. Java8 in Action (Urma Fusco and Mycroft: Manning), Mastering Lambdas (Maurice Naftalin: Oracle Press) and (presumably) Java SE8 for the really Impatient by Horstmann (Pearson), which I am told covers some Java7 features as well. Since the changes from Java5 to Java6 were principally additional classes rather than new language features, those books will probably get you up to date if you already know Java5.
 
Jason Wallwork
Greenhorn
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks again, Campbell. Especially about the main difference between 5 and 6 being more classes. That's really helpful to know. I hope I win the book, but even if I don't I may end up buying it or one of your other recommendations. My primary interest is in Android programming but I'd like to make some simple desktop apps, too.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 56529
172
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There were lots of structural changes in Java5, e.g. new memory model, generics, enums, annotations, but nothing like that in Java6. Java7 brought try with resources and enhancements to the switch statements and fork‑join, but there was nothing like that in Java6. Sun actually made a lot of that, saying the changes in Java6 were different from those in Java5.
Then came Java8…
 
Rob Spoor
Sheriff
Posts: 21133
87
Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Campbell Ritchie wrote:Java SE8 for the really Impatient by Horstmann (Pearson), which I am told covers some Java7 features as well.

It does, including try-with-resources and multi-catch.
 
Cay Horstmann
author
Ranch Hand
Posts: 197
22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, with modern publishing, it's amazing how easy it is to adapt one's material and publish slightly different books.

If you already know Java 5 or 6 and want to get up to speed with Java 8, I can highly recommend my "Java SE 8 for the Really Impatient" (http://horstmann.com/java8). It's very short and gives you all the features of Java 8 (and a few features of Java 7 that haven’t received much attention).

For those who are pretty new to Java but are very familiar with programming in general, there is "Java for the Impatient" (http://horstmann.com/javaimpatient/) It covers Java as if it had started with Java 8, without reliving the past. For example, lambda expressions are used throughout and inner classes get a brief treatment. And no desktop user interfaces.

And finally, there is the venerable Core Java (http://horstmann.com/corejava.html), which in two volumes, tells you everything that you would ever want to know about Java and its API. Volume I is up-to-date for Java 8, and I am working on updating Volume II right now. It'll be out in the summer.

Cheers,

Cay

 
Jason Wallwork
Greenhorn
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks again, Campbell and Rob. And thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question, too, Cay! That's really helpful. I like the idea of "short" although at some point I need to pick up a thorough Java reference which I'm guessing Core Java is. Thanks again!
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!