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Oracle Fusion Middleware free alternatives?

 
dylan payne
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Hey guys, me and my friends want to start a new project.Its our the first project for business.We have to use coldfusion but oracle products so expensive for us.Apache has got any free coldfusion product? Do you know any alternative programs.Ty guys.

New edit: its not coldfusion my mistake sorry just we need Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.1.2) with Oracle-HTTP-Server/2.2.22
 
Roel De Nijs
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Have you already looked at the ColdFusion WikiPedia page? It lists a few alternative server environments.
 
Tim Moores
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ColdFusion is dead, IMO. If you're starting a new project, you need to question the requirement to use it; where does that come from anyway?

NewAtlanta's BlueDragon lets you run CF in a JEE server, possibly even in a servlet container. But it ain't cheap. But I'm not aware of any free options.
 
Tim Holloway
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Is Cold Fusion still supported anywhere?

These days I think people are mostly using products like Ruby on Rails, Django, or PHP.
 
dylan payne
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Roel De Nijs wrote:Have you already looked at the ColdFusion WikiPedia page? It lists a few alternative server environments.


Tim Moores wrote:ColdFusion is dead, IMO. If you're starting a new project, you need to question the requirement to use it; where does that come from anyway?
NewAtlanta's BlueDragon lets you run CF in a JEE server, possibly even in a servlet container. But it ain't cheap. But I'm not aware of any free options.


Tim Holloway wrote:Is Cold Fusion still supported anywhere?
These days I think people are mostly using products like Ruby on Rails, Django, or PHP.


Sorry guys, I made a mistake, we need Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.1.2) with Oracle-HTTP-Server/2.2.22.Are they free to use?
 
Roel De Nijs
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dogukan aydin wrote:Are they free to use?

If you go to the appropriate website to download both products, you will know...
 
dylan payne
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Roel De Nijs wrote:
dogukan aydin wrote:Are they free to use?

If you go to the appropriate website to download both products, you will know...


I checked it but Im not sure about the version.I think developer version only use in non-profit things
 
Roel De Nijs
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dogukan aydin wrote:I think developer version only use in non-profit things

I think you are correct. These Oracle Fusion Middleware Software downloads are provided for evaluators under the OTN Free Developer License Agreement.
 
Tim Holloway
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It's probably more complicated than that.

In the old days, BEA/WebLogic - the predecessor for many of these products - would let you download a free evaluation copy with a 60 or 90 day run period. After which the product ceased to operate unless you bought a key.

Since then, pressures from open-source products (such as JBoss) have caused Oracle and IBM to release "Community Edition" versions of their products. These are often full-featured implementations - minus some of the Enterprise-grade bells and whistles (for example, I think DB2 CE is limited to a "mere" 1 GB of RAM usage). Some of these may be open to commercial use, since they figure that if you need it bad enough, eventually you'll start paying for support and/or the high-end features.

Then there are academic licenses, which may carry slightly different restrictions.

Unfortunately, I can't tell what licenses are available for the products in question.
 
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