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Lisa Austin
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I posted two days ago about my home work assignment. The verbiage was confusing for me. Thanks to Stefan Evans and Junilu Lacar for helping me out on that. I have finished and I'm wondering if you do not mind providing me feedback? What could I improve on and dare I ask perhaps what you may have done differently? I struggle with thinking of different ways of handling problems and would like to try and expand on this BUT once my brain thinks of one way that's all I seem to get out of it. I think seeing other solutions to issues I have done may help.

My original post
http://www.coderanch.com/t/665324/java/java/stuck-homework-assignment

The instructions provided
1) Create a Javabean called WeatherBean with 3 String attributes : morningWeather, noonWeather, and eveningWeather.
2) Create another javabean called RegionBean with 3 WeatherBean attributes: eastCoast, westCoast and realCoast.
3) Initialize weather for all regions at all times of day. Write a servlet to pass a RegionBean to a JSP that prints that noon weather on West Coast and morning weather on Real Coast.

I haven't done the JSP part or prepped it to pass but I'm familiar with that. That for me is easy . The hard part for me was figuring out how to get the weather from WeatherBean from RegionBean from the servlet. I struggled with the fact that my weathers ( noonWeather, morningWeather etc ) was a String object where my regions ( eastCoast, westCoast ) was a WeatherBean object and how to use setters and getters with them. Well my solution ended up being I didn't use the getters/setters for the weather from RegionBean or the servlet but instead used the weather getters ( getMorningWeather etc ) in the WeatherBean.

I couldn't figure any way around this. Was there anyway I could have used the setters from Region or the servlet?


----------- My WeatherBean -----------------------



------------- My RegionBean -----------------------------------




----------------------------- My WeatherServlet -----------------------------

 
Paul Clapham
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Seems to me that the little bit of code you're going to put in your JSP would look sort of like this in Java:



I don't see the need for all of that DayType code in your WeatherBean. It already has setters and getters for the three String attributes, so what's the DayType for? You could for example write



And I don't really see a use for the getWeather() method which you put into your WeatherBean, either. At least not based on the instructions you have there.


 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:Seems to me that the little bit of code you're going to put in your JSP would look sort of like this in Java:



I don't see the need for all of that DayType code in your WeatherBean. It already has setters and getters for the three String attributes, so what's the DayType for? You could for example write



And I don't really see a use for the getWeather() method which you put into your WeatherBean, either. At least not based on the instructions you have there.




Well I made that way more complicated then I needed. Which is why I am asking in the first place. I knew what I did wasn't really what the assignment asked for but rather a way I could get it to work. What you showed me was way easier.

How is this supposed to work ?


I don't see how I can declare and initialize a variable with it. If I try and pass a string ( "Still Raining" ) it conflicts the RegionBean's getWestCoast type which is a WeatherBean object . If I declare the variable as a WeatherBean object then it conflicts with setNoonWeather because it's a String object.
Both of the following do not work.



I'm under the impression that I need a variable with it so please let me know. Thank You!!
 
Paul Clapham
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Lisa Austin wrote:[How is this supposed to work ?


I don't see how I can declare and initialize a variable with it. If I try and pass a string ( "Still Raining" ) it conflicts the RegionBean's getWestCoast type which is a WeatherBean object . If I declare the variable as a WeatherBean object then it conflicts with setNoonWeather because it's a String object.
Both of the following do not work.



I'm under the impression that I need a variable with it so please let me know. Thank You!!


Aha. Well, your impression is wrong, so that looks like it's the source of your confusion. Notice that those "setter" methods all return void, i.e. they are declared public void setWhatever(String whatever). You've already discovered that you can't assign the result of such a method to a variable, but then you don't have to. Just call the "setter" method.
 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:

Aha. Well, your impression is wrong, so that looks like it's the source of your confusion. Notice that those "setter" methods all return void, i.e. they are declared public void setWhatever(String whatever). You've already discovered that you can't assign the result of such a method to a variable, but then you don't have to. Just call the "setter" method.


But part of #3 is " Write a servlet to pass a RegionBean to a JSP that prints that noon weather on West Coast and morning weather on Real Coast."

To save the weather values so the servlet can pass the values over to a JSP don't I need to initialize a variable with the value in ?
For example I would need to


But then that's where the conflict occurs.

I can do which will work great.
But I'm curious about what I'm missing with the later example you gave with and how I would pass that to a jsp?

Thank You
 
Lisa Austin
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Looking back again at our conversation. I'm guessing this is supposed to be used in the JSP and not the Servlet?

I'll need to try that.

I currently am trying to modifying my region bean and WeatherServlet to figure out how to not rely on my DayType enum and related code but I'm back to square one. I'm not really sure on the RegionBean how to initialize each region to weather which is where the Daytype enum came into play . On the RegionBean it set the TimeOfDay.

Without it I'm running back into the problem where the region variables are all WeatherBean types and the Weather variables are all String object types.
 
Paul Clapham
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No, you only need to pass the RegionBean to the JSP -- as the instructions specifically say. You would do all of the setting of weather conditions before you do that, though. Don't try to do everything all at once. The servlet-to-JSP pattern is very deliberate, it goes like this:

1. In the servlet: Create beans and set their values based on the servlet parameters, or from some other source, or (as in your example) just making them up.

2. Put the beans into request attributes.

3. Forward to the JSP.

4. In the JSP: Use JSTL to extract data from the beans and display that data in a suitable format.

Your instructions about how to set the attributes of the WeatherBean objects were sort of vague, but I guess you're just supposed to make up the data and hard-code it in the servlet.
 
Stefan Evans
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Hi Lisa.

I think you need to stop and think about the 'purpose' of the data structures you have a little.
This is the sort of code I would expect to see for initializing the data:


What we have here is
- Three instances of weather bean - one for each of the coasts. Each with different information.
- One instance of Region bean to hold all of the information in one handy place.
If you have the region bean, you can now display the weather at any time from any of the coasts.

But I'm curious about what I'm missing with the later example you gave with
region.getWestCoast().setNoonWeather("Still raining");
and how I would pass that to a jsp?


Rather than pass one specific value to the JSP, I would pass the Region Bean in its entirety.



Once the JSP page has the region bean (via an attribute presumably) then it has all the information it needs to answer any question you have about the weather.

That is one of the fundamental concepts about working with Servlets and JSPs.
The Servlet sets up all the data into attributes
The JSP then just has to read the information from the attributes.
In most cases it makes sense to put all the information to pass to a JSP into one Bean rather than setting several attributes.

So in a JSP I would look to see expressions like:


or preferably using EL



Is this starting to make more sense now?
 
Lisa Austin
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Hi Stefan ,

Please bear with me . I'm trying to digest everything you are telling me. This is the first time I've worked with this sort of scenario where we need to have one bean (RegionBean) obtaining information from another bean (WeatherBean) and then a servlet obtaining information from the second bean (RegionBean) to pass to a jsp. Up until now we have only had one bean, one servlet and then a jsp. So I've done okay with that. Then my other issue is also trying to work with the different sort of types with the two beans ( WeatherBean type and String Type).




I'm trying to make use of what you have given to me . To gain an understanding itt helps me when I see it in use rather than just read about it .

Just some clarification please . I take it that below is what you would use on the RegionBean to initialize the regions (eastCoastWeather , westCoastWeather etc ) .







But this isn't working for me. This would be what you would use on the WeatherServlet or the RegionBean? When I enter this on the WeatherServlet it doesn't know what eastCoastWeather, westCoastWeather etc is. If I use it on RegionBean then the WeatherServlet doesn't see if if I use "RegionalWeather" in the setAttribute. For request.setAttribute("regionalWeather", regionalWeather);




Thank You
 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:No, you only need to pass the RegionBean to the JSP -- as the instructions specifically say. You would do all of the setting of weather conditions before you do that, though. Don't try to do everything all at once. The servlet-to-JSP pattern is very deliberate, it goes like this:

1. In the servlet: Create beans and set their values based on the servlet parameters, or from some other source, or (as in your example) just making them up.

2. Put the beans into request attributes.

3. Forward to the JSP.

4. In the JSP: Use JSTL to extract data from the beans and display that data in a suitable format.

Your instructions about how to set the attributes of the WeatherBean objects were sort of vague, but I guess you're just supposed to make up the data and hard-code it in the servlet.



Well no the "weather" was supposed to be on the WeatherBean and the RegionsBean is supposed to get the weathers from the WeatherBean. The WeatherServlet is supposed to get the region and the weather from the RegionBean. I fear that I had this understanding but didn't communicate it which has caused an issue. I apologize. I think I didn't even occur to me until now how unclear those instructions were. Many of us in the class were confused and I only came to that by everyone's questioning and my own.

 
Paul Clapham
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Lisa Austin wrote:This would be what you would use on the WeatherServlet or the RegionBean? When I enter this on the WeatherServlet it doesn't know what eastCoastWeather, westCoastWeather etc is. If I use it on RegionBean then the WeatherServlet doesn't see if if I use "RegionalWeather" in the setAttribute. For request.setAttribute("regionalWeather", regionalWeather);


I think you have some other expectations which aren't necessary. For example I don't understand what you mean when you ask about "using something on the WeatherServlet". The concept of "using something on some Java object" probably matches something about Java which I do understand, but the phrasing is alien to me and I can't guess what it means.

Basically Stefan has done almost everything you need, but for some reason you think there is something else needed. I can't tell what that is, so perhaps we could get a bit more specific? You say "But this isn't working for me" -- in what way isn't it working? Are you just confused about where to put the code, or are you getting actual error messages? In the latter case it would be very helpful to post both the error messages and the code which produces them.
 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:
I think you have some other expectations which aren't necessary. For example I don't understand what you mean when you ask about "using something on the WeatherServlet". The concept of "using something on some Java object" probably matches something about Java which I do understand, but the phrasing is alien to me and I can't guess what it means.

Basically Stefan has done almost everything you need, but for some reason you think there is something else needed. I can't tell what that is, so perhaps we could get a bit more specific? You say "But this isn't working for me" -- in what way isn't it working? Are you just confused about where to put the code, or are you getting actual error messages? In the latter case it would be very helpful to post both the error messages and the code which produces them.



Hi Paul,

I apologize. I was referring to the code example he provided which followed my question. Something else I want to make sure is communicated is I think I wasn't clear about what I believe is expected with the assignment. The literal instructions my instructor gave to me is written out word for word but after questioning him I have the understanding that "weather" is supposed to be on the WeatherBean and the RegionsBean is supposed to get the weathers from the WeatherBean. The WeatherServlet is supposed to get the region and the weather from the RegionBean.

I am thinking that this isn't clear and maybe why I'm so focused on trying to work the assignment in a specific way.


I want to tell everyone Thank You so much for trying to help me here on this. I'm sorry I'm so dense.


Stefan gave me the following code which he says is what he would expect to initialize the data.





I assume that I would use the code in my Region bean as I have it here but I want to make sure that I'm correct.


------------- my RegionBean ---------------------------------






However I'm confused with the following lines of code.
Would these line of code also be used for initializing in the RegionBean? This is what I'm having trouble with.




If the above code is in my RegionBean and I need to set the Attribute using the variable "RegionalWeather" on my WeatherServlet the WeatherServlet doesn't know what "RegionalWeather" is. If I insert the code on my WeatherServlet then that fixes the problem of it knowing what "RegionalWeather" is but it doesn't know what the variables ("eastCoastWeather", "westCoastWeather", and "realCoastWeather") are in for example this line of code "regionalWeather.setEastCoast(eastCoastWeather);"

If I use this line of code in my

------------------ My Weather Servlet -------------------------------








 
Paul Clapham
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Lisa Austin wrote:Something else I want to make sure is communicated is I think I wasn't clear about what I believe is expected with the assignment. The literal instructions my instructor gave to me is written out word for word but after questioning him I have the understanding that "weather" is supposed to be on the WeatherBean and the RegionsBean is supposed to get the weathers from the WeatherBean. The WeatherServlet is supposed to get the region and the weather from the RegionBean.

I am thinking that this isn't clear and maybe why I'm so focused on trying to work the assignment in a specific way.


Yes, I think you have a few things backwards there. The weather data is supposed to be in a WeatherBean, that's right. (Java objects are conventionally thought of as containing data, so I said "in" and not "on" there.) And the RegionBean is supposed to contain three WeatherBean objects, yes, but it isn't responsible for getting the weather data from those objects. At least nothing in the instructions you originally posted says that.

And the WeatherServlet isn't supposed to get any data from any of those beans. It's only supposed to initialize them. Unfortunately the instructions don't make that clear -- they just say to initialize them but they don't say with what -- so that's what is messing you up.

Stefan gave me the following code which he says is what he would expect to initialize the data.

(Stefan's code from above)

I assume that I would use the code in my Region bean as I have it here but I want to make sure that I'm correct.


No. It's the WeatherServlet which should do that initialization. It's really unfortunate that the instructions say "Initialize the data" and then say "Write a servlet" because then the idea that the initialization belongs in the servlet is forced off the table and you're left trying to get other things to do the initialization. But if you write a WeatherServlet which does the initialization (as per Stefan's code) you'll find that makes a lot more sense. You already seem to have the part of the servlet code which sets up the request attribute and forwards to the JSP down, so that's a good thing.
 
Stefan Evans
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Just to make it absolutely clear, the code I provided does not belong in either of WeatherBean or RegionBean.
Those beans make up the data model. They are there to store the information, and that's it.

Where that information comes from is some other classes business.
Most probably, as Paul has said, it belongs in the Servlet somewhere maybe in an initialize method.
 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:

Yes, I think you have a few things backwards there. The weather data is supposed to be in a WeatherBean, that's right. (Java objects are conventionally thought of as containing data, so I said "in" and not "on" there.) And the RegionBean is supposed to contain three WeatherBean objects, yes, but it isn't responsible for getting the weather data from those objects. At least nothing in the instructions you originally posted says that.

And the WeatherServlet isn't supposed to get any data from any of those beans. It's only supposed to initialize them. Unfortunately the instructions don't make that clear -- they just say to initialize them but they don't say with what -- so that's what is messing you up.



No. It's the WeatherServlet which should do that initialization. It's really unfortunate that the instructions say "Initialize the data" and then say "Write a servlet" because then the idea that the initialization belongs in the servlet is forced off the table and you're left trying to get other things to do the initialization. But if you write a WeatherServlet which does the initialization (as per Stefan's code) you'll find that makes a lot more sense. You already seem to have the part of the servlet code which sets up the request attribute and forwards to the JSP down, so that's a good thing.



Oh geeze I GET it now ... OMG I'm so sorry guys. I spent the entire weekend trying to figure it out the way I thought it was supposed to be but I get it now . Now class is tonight and I have to try and fix this but that's okay. I'm not graded on this ,it's for me to learn which is still another reason why I'm going to work through it. Thank You so much for your patience ... all of you and again I'm so sorry. I had the wrong idea regarding the assignment in my head.

okay I THINK I have it.


Currently it isn't working but I'm working to figure it out but I THINK I'm on the correct track now?






-------------- This is what is in my doGet of my WeatherServlet -----------------------------------------



------------ This is in my RegionBean -----------------







-------- This is my jsp file ( name WeatherJSP.jsp ) --------------------


 
Paul Clapham
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You're almost there!

But you're still confused about the purpose of the RegionBean, it seems. The purpose of the RegionBean is to contain WeatherBean objects, no more than that. It's just a convenient way of grouping the WeatherBean objects for each of the three coasts. So: line 12 in your latest WeatherServlet, your thinking is backwards. You need to initialize the RegionBean here, and the way to do that is to call one (or more) of its setter methods. What you've done is to call one of its getter methods, which returns a WeatherBean object, and then your code just ignores what it returned. You've got a WeatherBean which is supposed to represent west coast weather, and your RegionBean has a setter method which accepts exactly that. So you'd call that setter method at line 12.

As for your comment in the RegionBean about no-parameter constructors: a JavaBean SHOULD have a no-parameter constructor. I feel like saying "MUST" but I'm not sure if that's technically correct. But anyway the no-parameter constructor is the normal way to design a JavaBean. You have setter methods which allow you to set the RegionBean's three attributes, so that's really all you need.

As for your JSP: I think the requirements were something like display the west coast's noon weather? Sorry for not scrolling back but it was something like that. Your JSTL expression is ${region.westCoast} which takes the RegionBean you passed as the request attribute and calls its getWestCoast() method. That returns the WeatherBean for the west coast. So far so good, but that's not the whole requirement. You need its noon weather. So you'd call its getNoonWeather() method to get that String value. Translated into JSTL that means ${region.westCoast.noonWeather}. I think it's the idea of chaining together these objects and getters which is sort of blowing your mind, but once you do it a few times you get used to it.
 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:You're almost there!

But you're still confused about the purpose of the RegionBean, it seems. The purpose of the RegionBean is to contain WeatherBean objects, no more than that. It's just a convenient way of grouping the WeatherBean objects for each of the three coasts. So: line 12 in your latest WeatherServlet, your thinking is backwards. You need to initialize the RegionBean here, and the way to do that is to call one (or more) of its setter methods. What you've done is to call one of its getter methods, which returns a WeatherBean object, and then your code just ignores what it returned. You've got a WeatherBean which is supposed to represent west coast weather, and your RegionBean has a setter method which accepts exactly that. So you'd call that setter method at line 12.

As for your comment in the RegionBean about no-parameter constructors: a JavaBean SHOULD have a no-parameter constructor. I feel like saying "MUST" but I'm not sure if that's technically correct. But anyway the no-parameter constructor is the normal way to design a JavaBean. You have setter methods which allow you to set the RegionBean's three attributes, so that's really all you need.

As for your JSP: I think the requirements were something like display the west coast's noon weather? Sorry for not scrolling back but it was something like that. Your JSTL expression is ${region.westCoast} which takes the RegionBean you passed as the request attribute and calls its getWestCoast() method. That returns the WeatherBean for the west coast. So far so good, but that's not the whole requirement. You need its noon weather. So you'd call its getNoonWeather() method to get that String value. Translated into JSTL that means ${region.westCoast.noonWeather}. I think it's the idea of chaining together these objects and getters which is sort of blowing your mind, but once you do it a few times you get used to it.



Thanks Paul for all of your help and support. Sorry I'm so late about this. Last night I went to class and my solution ended up not being too far off from the instructor BUT both mine and the instructors doesn't seem to work on my computer. No idea why. He checked my solution and said it should work. I then copied his solution and it too didn't work. By "work" I mean when I ran the servlet it came up but it didn't have any of the data. All it showed was the hardcoded part. He's suppose to upload his solution in GIT tonight or tomorrow JUST to make sure I didn't mistype his solution.

Anyways here is my final project. Again I can't tell you and the others how much I appreciate your help. I was able to complete two mini labs in class without issue. Probably because of your coaching.

I only copied and pasted the pieces that are truly applicable. I hope that's okay.

------------ My RegionBean -----------------------



------------ My WeatherServlet -----------------------




------------ My WeatherJSP -----------------------


------------ My WeatherBean -----------------------


 
Paul Clapham
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Lisa Austin wrote:BUT both mine and the instructors doesn't seem to work on my computer. No idea why. He checked my solution and said it should work. I then copied his solution and it too didn't work. By "work" I mean when I ran the servlet it came up but it didn't have any of the data. All it showed was the hardcoded part.


There's something that has to be done to tell your servlet processor that it's supposed to use JSTL when it finds it in JSP's. If the instructor's solution works on his computer but not on your computer then it's something to do with the configuration of the servlet processor. (Are you using Tomcat or something else?) It's been several years since I had to set that sort of thing up from scratch, so what I remember is probably not the current way to do it. You used to have to have some JSTL jar files in your project's WEB-INF/lib folder... but hopefully your instructor is more up to date on servlets and JSP than I am.

(I must say, I'm happy that you're starting out with JSTL. I see so many questions here from people who got started with scriptlets, which have been obsolete for well over a decade now.)
 
Lisa Austin
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Paul Clapham wrote:
Lisa Austin wrote:BUT both mine and the instructors doesn't seem to work on my computer. No idea why. He checked my solution and said it should work. I then copied his solution and it too didn't work. By "work" I mean when I ran the servlet it came up but it didn't have any of the data. All it showed was the hardcoded part.


There's something that has to be done to tell your servlet processor that it's supposed to use JSTL when it finds it in JSP's. If the instructor's solution works on his computer but not on your computer then it's something to do with the configuration of the servlet processor. (Are you using Tomcat or something else?) It's been several years since I had to set that sort of thing up from scratch, so what I remember is probably not the current way to do it. You used to have to have some JSTL jar files in your project's WEB-INF/lib folder... but hopefully your instructor is more up to date on servlets and JSP than I am.



I have someone at work who can help me if it's a configuration issue. I don't *think* it is ( but logically it probably is ) . I only say that because my other project worked. I shared it down below. Maybe something happened to the project folder I am using. I'll try a create a new project folder and see if that helps.

Again THANK YOU all. Thank You Paul for getting me to understand what everyone else was trying to tell me LOL I was so stuck on thinking the assignment was supposed to be done in one manner that I made it really complex.

Paul Clapham wrote:
(I must say, I'm happy that you're starting out with JSTL. I see so many questions here from people who got started with scriptlets, which have been obsolete for well over a decade now.)


That makes me happy to know we are on the correct path. We have touched on a few subjects which are old as a just in case we run across it type of thing but we aren't focused on it here.



------------- SkyBean.java --------------------------


-------- SkyMapServlet.java ------------------


---- COUDS.java Enum ---------------




---- Sky.jsp -----------






 
Paul Clapham
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And congratulations on getting working code! As for having to be dragged out of the blind alley you were going down... I don't know what we used to do before the Simpsons invented the word "D'oh!" It's such a useful word for computer programmers.

One comment: I wouldn't have initialized the RegionBean the way you did, but on the other hand the specs didn't say anything about how or where to initialize it. So given that, your way is just as good as my way.
 
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