Win a copy of Kotlin in Action this week in the Kotlin forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Is there a better way of doing this?  RSS feed

 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey again guys,

I figured I'd take what I've learnt so far and try making a simple calculator program... It works, but I'm sure there most be a more straightforward way of doing this. Any advice / suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


Thank you

Ben
 
Naziru Gelajo
Ranch Hand
Posts: 175
1
Java Netbeans IDE Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Ben, better way to do this is subjective. though I don't see the point of creating a new calculator object since you are still within the calculator class. All you have to do is call the method without creating the object.

The reason why I said better is subjective is because there are many ways to create a calculator program from a console perspective and from a GUI perspective as well.
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Forget the GUI for now I think, only started learning Java a couple of days ago

Ben
 
Dóra Takács
Ranch Hand
Posts: 39
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This looks like a very nice practice program for starters, good job!

I figured I'd take what I've learnt so far and try making a simple calculator program... It works, but I'm sure there most be a more straightforward way of doing this. Any advice / suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

So, you want to learn more. That is a good attitude!

1.) How about changing the if-else statements to a switch-case one? If you are using java 7 or higher, you can use Strings to pass into it. It is general to use it instead of ifs in a situation like this.
2.) You could try having the user only type in "3 + 12", in one line. Messing a bit with the scanner and its methods could work for that.

For a short program, it was nice and easy to read, so keep on the good work. I merely suggested these two enhancements because you asked for it! Up to the challenge?


Best regards, Dóri
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Dora,

Thank you very much for that feedback, really appreciate it.

Very much so, always up for a challenge! Keep them coming

Ben
 
Knute Snortum
Sheriff
Posts: 4073
112
Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Postgres Database VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Two more things: "user_input" should be called "userInput", that is, use camelCase for variables and method names.

Next, get everything out of the main() method. This may seem unnecessary for a short program, but it's a good habit to get into. See Main is a Pain.
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Morning all

Firstly, thank you for that link, Knute... I've done that now and understand why it's a good thing to do so will maintain that. However, I'm at a loss here. I'm fairly sure I am missing something very small somewhere...

This is the launcher (obviously):



This is the rest of the code in the separate file, but same package:



When I try to run it I'm getting the error: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassFormatError: Duplicate field name&signature in class file calculator/Calculator. Erm...??? I looked up the error and it says about a bug in NetBeans? Is that right or am I doing something wrong here? Any help please :/

Thanks,

Ben

P.S. Dori, I'm also working on the switch-case, but want to get this lil problem sorted first
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Actually, this is the fll error list:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassFormatError: Duplicate field name&signature in class file calculator/Calculator
at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass1(Native Method)
at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass(ClassLoader.java:763)
at java.security.SecureClassLoader.defineClass(SecureClassLoader.java:142)
at java.net.URLClassLoader.defineClass(URLClassLoader.java:467)
at java.net.URLClassLoader.access$100(URLClassLoader.java:73)
at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:368)
at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:362)
at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(URLClassLoader.java:361)
at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:424)
at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Launcher.java:331)
at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:357)
at calculator.CalculatorLauncher.main(CalculatorLauncher.java:7)

Ben
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Got it sorted...

I've marked amendments:

Launcher:


The rest :



I'm not sure why, but prior to this working it was giving me the error that it couldn't find the main class... I checked right clicking on project > properties > run > Main Class and it said calculator.Calculator and when I tried to change it to calculator.CalculatorLauncher as I was expecting to find it wasn't in the list. Any ideas why that might be? Oh, it's working fine now

Ben
 
Carey Brown
Bartender
Posts: 2996
46
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser Java MySQL Database VI Editor Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lines 24-50 are not inside a method body. I'm assuming they are meant to be inside run().
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, noticed that I guess only minutes before you posted NOT a mistake I'll be making in the future...

Thank you kindly for the help, Carey.

Ben
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here you go, Dori,

Think this is ok? It works fine

Launcher:



The rest:


Ben
 
Knute Snortum
Sheriff
Posts: 4073
112
Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Postgres Database VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Next challenge: what if the user enters "rewkjt"? That is, a non-number? And since you have to do that for two inputs, maybe another method or even class?
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey all,

Hope all are well.

So, here's a calculator that the entire calculation would be on a single input, not number - enter - next number etc... This seems to work fine Any suggestions / advice? Took a lot longer for me to figure that one out and it turned out to be so simple! :O



Ok, looking at the "drunk - rewkjt" user input now Also, is there ever a need to use float instead of double? There seems no obvious reason to do so.

Thanks,

Ben
 
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender
Posts: 10573
65
Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ben Poland wrote:So, here's a calculator that the entire calculation would be on a single input, not number - enter - next number etc... This seems to work fine

Great work Ben! I particularly like the way you've worked through the problem gradually and come up with different "versions" that use different styles. If you keep up that level of effort, you're going to be a good programmer; and in the meantime, enjoy a cow!

However, do you notice that after nicely breaking up all your logic in your earlier versions, you're now back to having all of it in one place again with Calc? Personally, I'd say that's a step backwards - although I can understand why you did it.

Just one alternative might be a generic "binaryFunction" method, viz:and then in your run() method your can simply write:
  System.out.println("Your answer is: " + binaryFunction(val1, function, val2));

However, there's arguably an even better way; and that's to use enums with a value for each operation you want to implement.
If you haven't got to them yet, don't worry about it; but if you have, have a think how you might use them.

HIH, and once again: Well done!

Winston
 
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender
Posts: 10573
65
Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ben Poland wrote:Also, is there ever a need to use float instead of double? There seems no obvious reason to do so.

Basically, the only reason you should ever use float is:
(a) When you've been told to.
(b) If another system that you have no control over is supplying them to yours.

You can, of course, convert the latter to a double; but it might give you a misleading sense of "accuracy", so you need to be careful about doing stuff like that.

HIH

Winston
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Winston,

Thank you for this feedback, I really appreciate it. The challenges, suggestions are a very good way to learn and it's very motivating, so really thank you very much for the help AND the cow Didn't know what you meant when I read that, then I read the description of "cows" here, really good idea, so whoever came up with it, GJ! I also agree about the code layout and will go back to how I'd done it before and keep that format moving forward.

I'll try the binary function suggestion, after I read about it that is And no, not got to enums yet, but as soon as I do I'll try that also. I'll also try to make this calc somewhat more "functional", include percent, square root, that sort of thing.

Again though, thank you so much for the help.

Ben
 
S Fox
Greenhorn
Posts: 18
1
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser Netscape
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I created a calculator a few weeks ago and did it the way winston suggested, using a switch statement inside a single method for the math operations. if you want to allow fraction, decimal, and whole numbers as input you could make overloaded methods. also could make your own class for representing fractions.
 
Winston Gutkowski
Bartender
Posts: 10573
65
Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ben Poland wrote:I'll try the binary function suggestion, after I read about it that is

Don't get too hung up on the name.
I simply called it 'binaryFunction()' to highlight the fact that it takes two values rather than one (or three, or four...). You could just call it 'function()' if you want.

All standard arithmetic operations are "binary" because they take two arguments - as opposed to 'log' or 'sin' or √, which only take one (they're called "unary").

Again though, thank you so much for the help.

You're most welcome.

Winston
 
Ben Poland
Ranch Hand
Posts: 97
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey all,

Hope you're well...

So, I have the calc getting percentages, square roots and throwing exceptions for illegal characters etc, happy with that, but the problem now is if the user for example enters 3x3 it will error as it's not been entered as 3 x 3, same if characters are not entered in the right case. I've been digging around to find a way to stop this, but not having any luck OR not understanding what I'm finding. Could anyone point me in the right direction to solve this please? I'd rather not just be told how to do it.

Thank you in advance guys,

Ben
 
Knute Snortum
Sheriff
Posts: 4073
112
Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Postgres Database VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For case problems: You will probably want to use someString.toLowerCase() or someString.toUpperCase(), and/or someString.equalsIgnoreCase().

The "3+3" part is harder, but I'd look into regular expressions, which in Java is implemented with the Pattern and Matcher classes. Without giving too much away, you would want to do something like this:

  • match a number
  • match any amount of whitespace, including zero
  • match a operator
  • match any amount of whitespace
  • match a number


  • If you want more clues about this I can give them to you.
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Hey Knute,

    Just read through the regex stuff, think I'll go back to that after sorting the case sensitive stuff I should have been a little clearer about what I was asking, but didn't think there was going to be such a difference here. It's only a char that I need to get taken as lower case... At the moment if I enter the character upper case, error, program ends... I saw the Character class and how that works, but doesn't work for this, well, doesn't seem to from what I've tried. Char variable is more than a single character, although the userInput is only a p or s. I tried adding it to the char declaration, the userInput, the System.out.println, but no joy on any. Hope that makes sense :/

    Thanks again

    Ben
     
    Winston Gutkowski
    Bartender
    Posts: 10573
    65
    Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote:if characters are not entered in the right case.

    What "characters"? If you chose 'x' as meaning "multiply" then you've only got yourself to blame, because the Java standard is '*'.

    And even if you did, you only have one character to worry about: 'x' (or 'X').

    There are solutions that involve "regular expressions", but TBH, I'm not sure you need one just at the moment.

    Have a think about WHAT you want your user to input: a "number", followed by an "operator", followed by another "number".

    You already had a solution that was working, but it would appear that you now want them to be able to enter either 'x' or 'X' instead of '*' as an operator. Have a look at your switch statement, and see if you can't amend it to handle your two new cases.

    Winston
     
    Knute Snortum
    Sheriff
    Posts: 4073
    112
    Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Postgres Database VI Editor
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Char variable is more than a single character, although the userInput is only a p or s.

    A char variable can only be one character. I'd use a String and someString.toLower() but if you must have a char, I think Character.toLower(charVar) will work. Maybe show us your code now.
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Hey guys,



    I have commented the sections I mean... And worry not, Winston, I'm not using x instead of *, that was just me typing when over tired and forgetting that my brain needs a break sometimes

    Thanks guys,

    Ben
     
    Winston Gutkowski
    Bartender
    Posts: 10573
    65
    Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote:And worry not, Winston, I'm not using x instead of *, that was just me typing when over tired and forgetting that my brain needs a break sometimes

    Fair enough.

    Unfortunately, it's starting to look a bit "monolithic" again because you have all your code in one place. Why not think about how you might break it up into "tasks", so that your run() code becomes a nice series of "do this...do that" calls to well named methods.

    That way, anyone can read what's going on really easily - "oh, he's getting some input here...then he's calculating a result...then he's printing it out...".
    It takes a bit of practice, but it usually results in cleaner, more flexible code that's much easier to read.

    HIH

    Winston

    PS: Don't forget to save this "version" before you do - especially if it works.
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    lol Winston, I like the "especially if it works"... Yes, it works

    So I am trying to figure this out, but suddenly realise what I wasn't understanding... And well, still don't, but playing, reading will address that fact

    I usually before making changes to anything start a new program, type the whole thing up again (helps to get it firmly into my brain) and then make all changes so then it really doesn't matter if things break etc... I always have the original

    So just to make sure I'm at least looking in the right direction, I should be writing another class and from within that class have methods running parts of the program and then refer back to it rather than writing line to line ("monolithic" ;) ) style code?

    Thanks,

    Ben

     
    Knute Snortum
    Sheriff
    Posts: 4073
    112
    Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Postgres Database VI Editor
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    What about rewriting Calc so that this code runs?

     
    Winston Gutkowski
    Bartender
    Posts: 10573
    65
    Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
    • Likes 3
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote:So just to make sure I'm at least looking in the right direction, I should be writing another class and from within that class have methods running parts of the program and then refer back to it rather than writing line to line ("monolithic" ;) ) style code?

    Kind of, but sorting out what classes (or objects) your program uses is slightly different.

    First off, you need to understand what you're doing. Note: What, not how.

    When you start out, there's a tendency to want to dive straight into code, because you think that's what you're supposed to be learning. It's also fun, and you get instant gratification when it works. However, most pros probably spend less than 20% of their time actually coding; the rest is spent analysing, designing, testing and just plain thinking.
    So if you see an old warhorse like me sipping coffee and staring off blankly into space, don't assume that I'm slacking off...or having a 'senior' moment.

    So, what is your program doing? I'd say it's doing a few things:
    1. It's getting an "operator" from a user.
    2. It's getting values for that operator to work on.
    3. It's applying that operator to the value (or values) you got.
    4. It's displaying the result back to the user.
    Now there may be a few other things it's doing too: For example, #1 above may involve validating the operator, and repeating input requests until your "user" gets it right", but even that's starting to venture into the "how" (ie, the procedure), when what you really want to concentrate on is the "what".

    So, if the above list seems reasonable, why not write some method signatures for it? Eg:
  • public char getOperator(Scanner s) { ...
  • public int getValue(Scanner s) { ...
  • public int calculate(int val1, char operator, int val2) { ...
  • public void displayResult(int result) { ...
  • Note that at this point I haven't written any code for those methods; just signatures.

    And now I can write a "draft" version of my run() method, viz:And now it "tells a story". Anyone looking at it can tell immediately what it's doing without all that "procedural clutter" - which, you may also note, I haven't even written yet.
    However, I can be pretty confident that when I do, the program will probably work the way I want it to.

    Like I say, it takes a bit of practice, and you'll probably develop your own techniques as you write more and more programs; but separating the "what" from the "how" is a really good place to start.

    HIH

    Winston
     
    Winston Gutkowski
    Bartender
    Posts: 10573
    65
    Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote:So just to make sure I'm at least looking in the right direction, I should be writing another class and from within that class have methods running parts of the program...

    I should add that what I showed you above was a way of breaking down a program functionally into tasks. However, we've still only got one class, and I think part of your question was: Should I be writing any more classes?

    And the answer to that (as with many things in CS) is: It depends. However, the mere fact you're thinking about it suggests that perhaps you should at least look into it. Java is an Object-Oriented language; and that means that it usually works best with objects (or classes).

    However, my suggestion would be to tackle this (as you already have) bit by bit.

    Come up with a nice, modular, "story telling" program first, and then we can delve into the business of "objects".

    HIH

    Winston
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Guys, this is some great advice! And unfortunately true for what I think I've been doing to some extent also, wanting to CODE! Very true, really do need to know what rather than how first, "cart in front of the horse", that's exactly what it is otherwise.

    Also, I started a project (will be calculator) from scratch, so aside the default stuff that displays it is just a blank canvas. I did that because I sat back and thought pretty much the way you said, I need to know WHAT I want to be happening rather than looking at what I already have and trying to fix something without understanding what it is exactly I want it to be doing, let alone how. So I'm going to slow down, back up a few steps and then approach the project in parts, break it down and get all the "whats" in order first, then approach the how, at which point I should better understand the dfferent things I will actually need to make the "whats" possible.

    Really, I can't thank you guys enough for your help... I'd probably end up running into one of those "brain walls" soon enough, but this advice will ensure avoiding that situation.

    So again, thank you very, very much,

    Ben
     
    Winston Gutkowski
    Bartender
    Posts: 10573
    65
    Eclipse IDE Hibernate Ubuntu
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote:So again, thank you very, very much

    You're most welcome. And good luck!

    Winston
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ok, so this is not ideal... I want this working without switches and still have to get the whitespace and characters to be ignored, but wanted to at least be more specific about what a user wants rather than having to go through everything. It's more flexible and nicer to be able to call to methods and only execute what's necessary. I kinda like this, but not finished yet

    Thoughts? Suggestions?


    Thanks guys

    Ben
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I personally think that I'm at least heading in the right direction with this, but feel free to correct me if you think otherwise

    Thanks again,

    Ben
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    So a few small changes:



    Cleaned it up a little and added some little extra things I wanted in there. Still feel like there's a lot to do with it, but step at a time

    Ben
     
    Knute Snortum
    Sheriff
    Posts: 4073
    112
    Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Postgres Database VI Editor
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    It looks good. I would try two more things -- or tackle the valOpVal problem:

    * Remove all user input from the calculation. Put it in methods of a different class. This will set you up to start a GUI.
    * Put a loop in run() so that the user can do several calculations, then type "q" to quit.

    Now a note on your formatting. In general it looks really good except two things:

    * Comments at the end of ends should be avoided, or be very short.
    * Your lines should be shorter. The best way is to make them 80 characters or less. Here's the start of your class with the formatting suggestions:
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    "||" tackle valOpVal problem, Knute? "&&" tackle valOpVal problem ;) Couldn't help myself from doing that

    Will get both done... Your suggestions are what I figured would have to be the next steps to get this project to a final working program, so now I have to implement them. I hadn't thought of the q to quit thing though, I like that idea a lot.

    I really appreciate all the pointers, suggestions and general advice you guys have given me. I hope it continues And when I get good enough myself, hope to be able to do the same for other people...

    Cheers guys, really glad I found this forum

    Ben

    P.S. Next version coming soon
     
    Daniel B. Davis
    Greenhorn
    Posts: 11
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote: is there ever a need to use float instead of double?


    You would use float instead of double whenever you wanted to lose precision because your data does not warrant it. There are several ways that could occur:
  • Your data is not so precise as the float
  • You have accumulated errors which you want to lose, while retaining most of the value


  • Once, when I was a beginning programmer, I had access to a vector display in the room where I was working. Each day, upon completing work, I played on the vector display. I constructed an image of a windmill using two isosceles triangles point-to-point, among other graphics. When I made them rotate, they gradually became distorted. It did not matter whether I used double or float; they still got distorted. I clearly understood that a detailed analysis of error would have prevented the distortion. But I chose the easy way: every rotational cycle was computed in double. At the end of each cycle, all coordinates were truncated to float before starting the next cycle. By truncating to float, the errors accumulated during computation were lost, and everything started clean again. Errors accumulate because digital fractions do not evenly express decimal fractions. The more calculations you do before correcting them, the closer the errors become to the decimal point. After the change: rock solid images!!
     
    Ben Poland
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 97
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Hey Daniel,

    That's very interesting actually, certainly not something I'd think about. Cetainly good to know. So float used more in an animation environment?


    Hey Knute,

    I'm working on this now, but just want to clarify I'm not ballsing this right up! I have another class setup with a bunch of methods for user input and the other class has methods for calculating those inputs... Soooo, it's kinda bouncing back and forth between those classes / methods? It's far from finished on even one yet, but I'll post what I have so far... Please let me know if I'm way off base. I tried something like this before, but was unable to get the final value to pass into another method, which is why I decided I'd take a step back first and just go the method route for now. I'll post the code I have now and then explain more what I mean. There are errors all over the place, but please ignore those unless there are BIG no no's, this is very much work in progress.



    One class and second class:



    So as you can see I've basically split user input into one class and calculations in another with each type of calculation in it's own method, far from finished as you'll see. I'm also probably going get rid of the switch statement for + - * / and just set a method for each, especially because of the loop and also wanting to be able to get a longer sum on a single line (3 * 3 + 3 / 2 for example), although that may well be better done in a single method.

    Anyway's, there's what I have for now, am I going hideously wrong? :O

    Thank you

    Ben
     
    Campbell Ritchie
    Marshal
    Posts: 55751
    163
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Ben Poland wrote:. . . Also, is there ever a need to use float instead of double? There seems no obvious reason to do so.

    Thanks,

    Ben
    As far as I am concerned, a float is an affliction which should be avoided unless some API, e.g. this forces you to use it. I am also not convinced that changing doubles to floats improves precision. A better way to rotate images is (probably) to copy the Graphics object:-I have not had problems with rotation; it is shear that causes problems with arithmetic.
     
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!