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Android ADB can't find entry point WSAPoll on WS2_32.dll

 
Leonardo Carreira
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Hi Everyone,

I use Windows XP to run Android Studio 2.1.2.
The Android Studio was fine, i could select the destination Device to install my APK, by clicking Run button.
But i don't know what happened, when i tried to Run the application again, there's nothing to show on Select Deployment Target dialog anymore as shown below :



Then i tried to run the adb command on command prompt, but i got the following error :



I've tried to re-install Android Studio 2.1.2 on my computer, but the error still remains.

Kindly your help on this issue.

Thanks in advance,
Best regards,

Leo
 
Brian Tkatch
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Does WS2_32.dll ewist on your system (in the system32 directory)? Does it have that entry point?
 
Leonardo Carreira
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Hi Brian,

Thanks for your reply.
I've tried to open the Ws2_32.dll by using Depedency Walker, but can't find method called WSAPoll.
I got an information from other forum says that WSAPoll is a command that's not exist in the WinXP platform.
I've got this issue resolved now.

The problem was, i updated the platform-tools, seemingly the latest platform-tools wasn't compatible for WinXP.
Right now i switch back to use Android Studio 1.4.1 and use the original ADB that's bundled with it.
i won't re-download the platform-tools.

Thanks,
Best regards,

Leo
 
Brian Tkatch
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Leo, thank you for coming back and reporting.

If you are feeling rather adventurous, you might be able to update the runtime and self-register the DLLs manually. You can do that "sometimes" on Windows. To test if a DLL will actually load, use rundll32 from the command line. A search online for rundll32 example ought to show you how to do that.

Of course, you could also just download Ubuntu (or the like) and run it in a VM, enjoying all the updates virtually natively.
 
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