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Randall Twede
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I remember lisp from my youth.I didn't like it. I have seen samples of Haskel. I can't decipher it.
I guess you stuck with me for a while. I want to learn more about functional programming and Chris provided some links.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Old joke: LISP stands for Lots of InSipid Parentheses

LISP is hardly the language to judge the readability of functional programming in general by.
 
Sean Corfield
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When folks complain about Lisp, I tend to point them to this graphic: http://blog.ppenev.com/parens.png

If you use an editor designed for a Lisp, it will manage the parentheses for you, offer "structural editing" (as well as textual editing), and usually color the parens so they literally fade into the background.

Some people just can't get past the parentheses -- I'm not sure why. For those who do, a modern Lisp like Clojure is a truly wonderful thing to work with, day-in and day-out. I've been doing production Clojure for over five years now and I'm happy to answer any questions you have about learning it.

Haskell's readability tends to be hampered by an over-reliance on "punctuation" for operators, in my opinion, and I've had a love/hate relationship with that language for over 25 years now.

The main thing people notice, when trying to learn FP via almost any language, is just how concise FP code tends to be. Depending on what you're used to, that can equate to "unreadable". I personally find Java so verbose as to be pretty much unreadable and I find Clojure much more readable in general -- and even Haskell can be pretty readable once you understand the operators and/or the types of the functions. But both languages look very different to the "traditional" C-family (including Java).

What would you like to hear about what it's like to work in a functional programming language?
 
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