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need some good JSF books  RSS feed

 
J. Kevin Robbins
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I need to learn JSF. I've spent the last 8 hours trying every tutorial I can find and they all suck. Either they are outdated, or incomplete, or result in server errors that I can't resolve. I thought I found a decent one by BalusC but it uses WildFly as a server and I can't get it running.

So frustrating. 

Can anyone advise good books that take the reader step-by-step through setting up the server, Eclipse, the needed extensions and so on?

 
Mike London
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J. Kevin Robbins wrote:I need to learn JSF. I've spent the last 8 hours trying every tutorial I can find and they all suck. Either they are outdated, or incomplete, or result in server errors that I can't resolve. I thought I found a decent one by BalusC but it uses WildFly as a server and I can't get it running.

So frustrating. 

Can anyone advise good books that take the reader step-by-step through setting up the server, Eclipse, the needed extensions and so on?



I totally agree. I gave up on JSF for this very reason. I had the latest JSF book (Core JSF), but ran into code in it that just did not work. I posted here, Stack OverFlow, and worked on the code for days. Nobody ever knew what the problem was. I was stumped. I took the available support as a reason to just not continue. Since I wasn't working on an active JSF project and was just learning it on my own, I stopped.

The Web site for the book wasn't working for me either. It came up with some weird error.

On the other hand, although I'm not crazy about Spring, it's extremely well supported and seems to be the most popular framework these days.

How to quickly create nice front ends continues to be a challenge. JSF (and Tapestry) both go a long way to help you create nice front ends.

Oh, so maybe look at Tapestry. Like JSF it has nice front end controls.

Good luck.

- mike
 
J. Kevin Robbins
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The problem is, I have an interview in about 3 hours with an employer who uses JSF. I spent most of yesterday, up late last night, and still this morning trying to learn enough to at least be able to speak intelligently about JSF. I've gotten nowhere. The lack of good learning materials is very frustrating. I would need a couple of weeks minimum, to prepare for this.

So I'll just have to admit my lack of experience and do the best I can with the rest of the interview. I'm tempted to just back out of it because I'm missing a lot of the requirements that they are looking for, but I'm just not a quitter. I'll do the best I can even if I embarrass myself. If by some stroke of luck I get the job, then I'll be spending a lot of late nights and weekends to get up to speed on their technology stack. But I'm afraid it's a long shot.

But what the hell. If I don't do the interview then I have zero chance of getting the job. If I do it and perform poorly, then I still have a chance that's something greater than zero.
 
Tim Cooke
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Best of luck with the interview Kevin.

Most employers put all sorts of crazy on their job advert requirement lists, don't be put off by the fact that you aren't the field expert in all of them. Think of it as a wish list rather than a requirements list.

Be confident about what you do know. Be honest about what you don't know. And don't be an asshole.
 
Mike London
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J. Kevin Robbins wrote:The problem is, I have an interview in about 3 hours with an employer who uses JSF. I spent most of yesterday, up late last night, and still this morning trying to learn enough to at least be able to speak intelligently about JSF. I've gotten nowhere. The lack of good learning materials is very frustrating. I would need a couple of weeks minimum, to prepare for this.

So I'll just have to admit my lack of experience and do the best I can with the rest of the interview. I'm tempted to just back out of it because I'm missing a lot of the requirements that they are looking for, but I'm just not a quitter. I'll do the best I can even if I embarrass myself. If by some stroke of luck I get the job, then I'll be spending a lot of late nights and weekends to get up to speed on their technology stack. But I'm afraid it's a long shot.

But what the hell. If I don't do the interview then I have zero chance of getting the job. If I do it and perform poorly, then I still have a chance that's something greater than zero.


JSF is easy to pick up initially -- the Core JSF book is good for that. The thing that can make any framework difficult to learn at first is that it's, well, a framework and thus the code is abstracted. To that end, I would recommend using s JSF-aware IDE to help keep the project working.

If I were going into this interview, I would just say I had done some tutorials and was really interested to learn more. Maybe mention a book you bought or bring in some sample code from something else to show off your skills.

I agree with the other poster too, most jobs have "kitchen sink" requirement lists (often created by HR folks who can't spell J-S-F) when only a few skills are needed. And, even then, you don't have to be a "Master" of all of them.

Good luck on the interview.

- mike

 
J. Kevin Robbins
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Thanks to all for the encouragement and well wishes. The interview is now two hours away. To say I'm nervous would be an understatement.
 
Uwe Lindenberg
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Hi Kevin,

best luck for the interview. Perhaps the wiki by Paul is suitable. It's short, good and available: https://bitbucket.org/paulstat/oracle-jsf-expert-1z0-896/wiki/Home

Best wishes,

Uwe
 
J. Kevin Robbins
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Thanks everyone. It wasn't as difficult as I expected. I can't say I aced it, but I hope I kept them interested enough to keep me on the short list.

So that's two interviews that I'm waiting on feedback. I hate the waiting part. I think I'll take a short break from the computer today. This week has been a non-stop marathon of Spring, JSF, and practice interview questions. I feel like I've been trying to drink from a fire hose.

Thanks for the link, Uwe, I'll look at that. And time to order some more books from Amazon.

Sorry for wandering so off-topic in this thread.
 
Richard Hayward
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J. Kevin Robbins wrote:I need to learn JSF.


I'm just a beginner but this was an excellent tutorial that helped me get started.

https://www.udemy.com/jsf-tutorial/

Top marks to Chad for clarity.
 
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