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Questions about Groovy

 
Greenhorn
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What are Homebrew & Macports? Do I need both of them to install Groovy? Why? Do I need to install one before the other? In what order?

I have both Netbeans & Intellij IDEs on my Mac.

I considered Jython/Python but I've changed my mind.

I'd like to learn Java & Kotlin & Groovy & maybe Scala. I don't like the verbosity of Java. Groovy is almost as verbose as Java.

I'd like to learn Groovy but I don't want to fool with the Terminal. Why doesn't Groovy have a .dmg install? I don't want to screw something up on my Mac.

I've looked at Groovy syntax & it's almost identical to Java syntax.
 
Marshal
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Mac OS X VI Editor BSD Linux
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David Clark wrote:What are Homebrew & Macports?

These are package management software. Basically designed only for your convenience and nothing more. Homebrew is for Linux and OS X, Macports only for OS X. Primitive example. In order to install Gimp, without using package managers, you'd need to download packages/libraries x and y and then install. Using one of those managers you'd say "I want install Gimp" and that is it. It would download for you and would install. If you wouldn't like it, you could say "Uninstall it, I didn't like", so it would find what was installed, where it was installed, so it could remove finally.

David Clark wrote:Do I need both of them to install Groovy? Why? Do I need to install one before the other? In what order?

You don't need any of those in order to install Groovy.

=David Clark wrote:I have both Netbeans & Intellij IDEs on my Mac.

Choose anyone you like and use one.

I don't want to screw something up on my Mac.

It isn't that easy. If you have one of those package managers, just write:
MacPorts: sudo port install groovy (you'll need enter administrators password)
Homebrew: brew install groovy

I'd suggest you not to mess around with few tens of languages at the same time. Pick one, get basic understanding, then think what do you want next, continue or try something different. Anyway, choosing one or another programming language it depends on what kind of projects you're willing to work. So, define what are your interests in terms of programming?
 
David Clark
Greenhorn
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Package managers? Like RPM or DEB on Linux?

Do I need both of them to install Groovy? Why? Do I need to install one before the other? In what order?

You don't need any of those in order to install Groovy.

I still need to use the Terminal. Without Macports or Homebrew, what Terminal commands do I use? Suppose that the install halts with a warning. I wouldn't know how to respond.

How do I uninstall Groovy from the Terminal?

 
Ranch Hand
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One of the best ways to manage Groovy and other java based tools is SDKMan. Once installed, you can then install Groovy like so:



If you want to remove it:

 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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