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olive oil

 
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I like cooking with butter. but butter burns(if you cook too hot) and it melts at room temperature.
I read this book by a snake oil salesman. he was right about some things. he says shortening and vegetable oils were introduced after ww1.
he says it started from a lubricant for Nazi submarines. they badmouthed lard and butter.
the same people who told you fluoride was good in your water.
anyway, to make a long story longer, he says the only good vegetable oils are olive and coconut. he especially badmouths soybean and canola.
I started using olive oil and I can taste the difference. yeah It costs more but it tastes better.
 
Marshal
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Be aware that "olive oil" and "extra virgin olive oil" are very different things. The former is great for cooking, the latter should be reserved for salads and other "drizzling" uses.

I'm also a fan of grapeseed oil due to a higher smoke point.

I've lately started trying avocado oil -- jury's still out.
 
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Yes olive oils are good for heart. IMO butter is also good to eat but sometime, not daily as It increases cholestrol level. We need cholestrol from food but in small amount because our body creates It internally. Yes I read about coconut oil is also good also not expensive If you make an anology between the price of Olive and coconut oil. Soyabean being good Or bad for health has been much disputed subject. Being vegetarian I used to eat soya chunks and rarely tofu as source of protein but abandoned It since I heard It's bad impact on body. Not sure but better be on safe side.
 
Randall Twede
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I have no evidence to back me up, but I would say avoid soybeans in any form. I always hated tofu
 
Randall Twede
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beans are good for protein. I have been eating beans a lot lately. they taste good, good for you, and last for years. I was gonna start a topic about beans; and how I use Louisiana hot sauce with them. they are good hot or cold. I like the short lists of ingredients for the beans and the "hot" sauce
 
Ganesh Patekar
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In India tofu is not much known but I read a lot about health and good foods etc, that time I came to know about tofu and tempeh. I had had perhaps not more than 10 Or 12 times and was skeptical about tofu  being organic so not eating it anymore.
 
Ganesh Patekar
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beans and lentils that is what I eat at dinner most of the time. High in soluble fiber makes your stomach full for long time and good source of protein for vegeterians.
 
Randall Twede
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Ganesh, I am not vegetarian, but I also love beans and lentils :^)
 
Ganesh Patekar
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Yes most of the people love to eat beans and lentils.
 
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I found out to my surprise that olives are being grown commercially in Florida. I didn't think the climate was suited, but there are 4 varieties that like it here. Some of the orange groves down mid-state have been putting in olive trees to be less dependent on temperature and disease than when growing straight citrus. Plus, olives will grow even in the parts of the state that are too cold for most citrus. We're a long way from shipping commercially around the world, but I've been considering putting in a tree myself. The oldest olive nursery in the state (a bit more than 100 years old) is about a 2-hour drive from here. in the same town where "pineapple" oranges were developed.

Extra-virgin olive oil has the most flavor, but the lowest smoke point. Best for salad dressings and finishing, rather than cooking. There are places where "oil snobs" consider different EVOO varieties like they were fine wines. Around here, we have to take what we can get.

Coconut oil has gotten popular lately. I think it has a fairly low smoke point, though.

I've no interest myself in avacado oil, although it has its proponents. I believe it's a low smoke-point oil.

Regular olive oil has about the next-highest smoke point, I think. Little or no flavor.

Soybean oil is probably the most common cooking oil around here. If not, then likely it's "canola" oil. There isn't any such plant as a "canola" - it's what the Canadian Oil Association named rapeseed oil to cover the fact that they were producing oil out of rape seed. Some people got the wrong idea. Kind of like with spotted dick.

Corn oil is also popular of course. I think it's a tad more temperature-tolerant that soy or canola, but I'd have to go back and check.

Peanut oil is fairly good for higher temperatures. I use it for stir-fry a lot. It has mild peanut flavor, if any.

At the hot end of the spectrum, there's grapeseed oil. This is a great stir-fry oil, since it can take a lot of heat and doesn't have much flavor of its own.

I think those are most of the popular cooking oils. Then there's the specialty stuff like sesame oil - Asian dishes are great with this stuff, walnut oil - flavorful for salad dressing and full of Omega-3's, but it goes rancid pretty fast. And lots, lots more.

Olive oil is popular both as the base of a lot of Italian cooking (or as often as not, both beginning and end), and is part of what is thought to make the "Mediterranean Diet" so healthy. It's thought that it greases your arteries so that cholesterol won't stick (roughly speaking).


But if you like to cook with butter, take a cue from the French and Indians. The primary reason butter burns is that butter contains oil, solids, and water. If you convert your butter to ghee or clarified butter (they're almost, but not quite the same thing), then you end up with something that will not only stand higher temperatures, but won't require refrigeration. And you can save the solids and use them for flavoring. It's not that difficult to do, actually.

As for that garbage about where vegetable fats come from, I'd take it with a generous helping of salt. Anything that piggybacks vilification of fluorides or other conspiracy favorites is probably being selective with the truth. Yes, technically some cheeses are plastic, glue, and/or sawdust, but half a truth is sometimes worse than an outright lie. And in the case of margarine, I think dates closer to WWI than the Nazis.

 
Marshal
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Tim Holloway wrote:. . .  oil out of rape seed. Some people got the wrong idea. Kind of like with spotted dick. . . .

We used to have spotted dick when I was at school. We never thought there was anything funny about the name (or about the dish). Not even as teenage boys.
Rape is a plant related to the cabbage which covers much of lowland England with mustard yellow flowers in May, and I suspect most “vegetable oil” sold here is rapeseed oil. Actually, I think you can use mustard seed oil too, which is even more closely related to rape than cabbage.
What about oil from daisies? It is very popular in Europe. Not daisies, but similar. Sunflower seeds.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Ganesh Patekar wrote:not daily as It increases cholestrol level.


Myth. Dietary cholesterol is no longer considered a factor for serum cholesterol.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Tim Holloway wrote:I've no interest myself in avacado oil, although it has its proponents. I believe it's a low smoke-point oil.


No. It's one of the highest at 520ºF (refined, 480ºF unrefined).
 
Ganesh Patekar
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Bear Bibeault wrote:Myth. Dietary cholesterol is no longer considered a factor for serum cholesterol.

I hope so. If It is then I'll be much happier because I don't even remember when I had butter last time. There was a time I used to eat 50 grams of butter(Home made because we have milk dairy) everyday in the morning. You know, sometime internet is boon and bane, so many different information gets circulated which just baffles. But I have ghee frequently.
 
Tim Holloway
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Yep, I forgot Sunflower and safflower oils, which are both pretty light. They're cooking oils, but also popular in salad dressings where you want something lighter than soybean oil.

The dietary cholesterol thing has been pretty well discounted now, so if your favorite breakfast is 3 eggs fried in a pond of butter, rejoice! Although you can still kill yourself with a high-fat diet if that's your poison.

The evil scale for solid fats runs something like this:

Really evil: vegetable shortening (hydrogenated vegetable oil)
Evil: Margarine (hydrogenated/partially-hydrogenated)
Semi-evil: butter
less evil: lard - unless you're a pig. Then it's very evil indeed.

There were 2 parts to this: one was cholesterol, one was carcinogens. Without the cholesterol considerations anymore, it's mainly cancer, both from a high-fat diet and from the particular evils of hydrogenation. We gave up on hydrogenated peanut butter a while back. However, non-hydrogenated peanut butter separates. Fortunately we discover a neat little crank device that you screw onto the jar that does a much better (and neater) job of mixing the solid and oil parts back together than we got from just using a plain old bread knife.

My local supermarket stopped carrying lard. And at the same time, expanded their Mexican food offerings. Which is ironic, since a lot of Mexican cuisine requires lard if it's going to taste authentic. I've been known to fake it in my refried beans using olive oil and/or butter.

Mustard oil is popular in Indian cuisine, though the US Government refused to label it Generally Recognized as Safe. I think it gets imported as a "hair care" product that people just happen to cook with. Then again, Mexican Oregano isn't GRAAS either. Mustard oil does carry a mustard tang.

Rapeseed oil under the "Canola" label is very common here. But I've heard of English food market chains soft-pedalling the "spotted dick" name in recent times.

I don't know about getting oil from daisies. Sunflower seeds are basically like nuts, and like all nuts, can be pressed for oil. Unless your daisies have a lot more character than mine, all you'd get would be daisy juice, I think.

BTW, Red beans and Rice is a traditional New Orleans washday meal. On Tuesdays, you'd put a big pot on to cook while doing the laundry. Although I've seen recipes where apparently you lay waste to the fauna for miles around, starting with andouille sausage, going on to ham, pork neck bones, hocks, venison, and maybe even the odd alligator part or 2, it's just fine with no meat, olive oil and a touch of smoke flavoring. And red pepper, of course!

 
Marshal
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:We used to have spotted dick when I was at school. We never thought there was anything funny about the name (or about the dish). Not even as teenage boys.



That's because you weren't Americans. When you ride the Tube into London from Heathrow just watch for the people who giggle when the voice says "This is a Piccadilly Line train for Cockfosters".
 
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Oilve Oyl will be most happy to cook you some Spinach  
34de3270c6d495800dd3f12bc2d4f6fd.jpg
[Thumbnail for 34de3270c6d495800dd3f12bc2d4f6fd.jpg]
 
Greenhorn
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It's a good idea to cook with olive oil.
The only olive oil I recommend is extra virgin olive oil. It has a lower smoke point than regular olive oil, but richer for vitamins and minerals.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Paul Clapham wrote:. . . spotted dick when I was at school. . . .

That's because you weren't Americans. . . .

I am told South Africans are worse about spotted dick. And what is funny about Cockfosters?

About twenty years ago, I went to Sainsburys' and bought a packet of a packet of ℨum Fest biscuits (=cookies) and having learnt German as a child, I took ℨum Fest to mean For Christmas and the Z being written ℨ didn't bother me. That is how you write Z in Germany. Ruth's sister said, “Can I have some of those Bum Fest biscuits?” and next year the Z looked more like this: Z. Familiarity with the ℨ or Cockfosters or spotted dick means there simply isn't anything funny about it. Just as well you don't live along the course of a certain stream in Southern Dorset.

But familiarity with spotted dick is something you can take or leave
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Tim Holloway wrote:. . . less evil: lard - unless you're a pig. . . . My local supermarket stopped carrying lard.

Hahahahahahahaha! We have had shops stopping selling lard in Europe too, but for different reasons; increased demand particularly from people from Central and Eastern Europe has exhausted the supply. If you find Paul Wheaton's other website, there is a post somewhere about how to make lard from a pig. It looks nearly as evil to the pig as a Greenland shark to a seal; the fish can strip the blubber without going inside the seal's ribcage. The lard video also shows how to make pork scratchings or similar.

. . . Sunflower seeds are basically like nuts, and like all nuts, can be pressed for oil. . . .

You aren't pressing me for oil. When I was at school, the biology master had a well‑ripened, dried sunflower and rubbed his finger over it to produce eyes and a mouth rather like the little Weed and said if we ever had children with flowers with faces in their picture books we should tell them we have really seen a flower with a face.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Craig William wrote:It's a good idea to cook with olive oil.
The only olive oil I recommend is extra virgin olive oil. It has a lower smoke point than regular olive oil, but richer for vitamins and minerals.


But not recommended for cooking. Oils with low smoke points can not only turn bitter when heated past their smoke points, but develop carcinogenic compounds that should be avoided.

"Regular" olive oil is my "go to" oil for cooking, but extra virgin oil is for salads and sipping.
 
Randall Twede
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I don't get this extra virgin stuff. virgin means pure, right?
how can anything be extra pure?
"now girl, you be extra virginal tonight"?
 
Bear Bibeault
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Wikipedia wrote:Virgin means the oil was produced by the use of mechanical means only, with no chemical treatment. The term virgin oil with reference to production method includes all grades of virgin olive oil, including Extra Virgin, Virgin, Ordinary Virgin and Lampante Virgin olive oil products, depending on quality ...



Wikipedia wrote: Extra-virgin olive oil Comes from virgin oil production only, and is of higher quality: among other things, it contains no more than 0.8% free acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste, having some fruitiness and no defined sensory defects. Extra-virgin olive oil accounts for less than 10% of oil in many producing countries; the percentage is far higher in the Mediterranean countries (Greece: 80%, Italy: 65%, Spain 50%).


Read more ...
 
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what a beautiful post.
I would just say that extra virgin oil is great to fry...
few people know just because is expensive.

Different qualities of not olive oil are great, even if not for eating.

Last remark goes over eating it daily. Yes. Because what matters is physical activity( at every age up to  104 as an actual  104 years old marathoner shows),
and enemy number one should be added sugar( artificial), not natural healthy rich of vitamin D oil:)
 
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Yes, added sugar was always the problem.  

It seems healthy food is always second to a healthy economy as far as the (UK) government is concerned.  

Currently the uk is considering lifting the current (EU) ban on [nasty American] chlorinated chicken, regardless of any health issues this may cause.  Its all about trade!  I confess I don't know too much about "chlorinated" chicken - but I don't see the health benefits of eating meat that has been washed in chlorine. Expect it cheap to produce however.  

Similar situation with the sugary drinks, the manufacturers have had considerable money to lobby [bribe] the various governments.  Milk industry too, it not common knowledge that adult humans don't really digest cows milk easily.  

Guess you have to take "advise" with a pinch of salt!      
 
Tim Holloway
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Bettter chlorinated chicken than Pink Slime. That's something like the meat scraps ground up, treated with ammonia and used as filler. I think it was finally banned.

I can see the USA washing chicken with chlorine. We're paranoid about salmonella, and with good reason. Factory farming may be "efficient", but it costs in terms of meat loaded with antibiotics and a greater risk of wide-scale contamination.

I don't like chicken. I don't even like tofu because to me, it's very much like chicken. In fact, I'm not a big fan of any actual meat anymore. But some of the new "fake meat" products are pretty convincing. Not like the older stuff that had little flavor and poor consistency. The latest crop, in fact even has "blood", but I don't feel the need to go that far myself.

Adult humans originally lacked the ability to digest milk. About 5000 years ago, a mutation sprang up somewhere around Anatolia and spread from there - mostly into Europe and thence via the American settlers. Probably why Chinese cuisine has a notable lack of cream or cheese in it.
 
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