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Secrets of a JavaScript Ninja: ES6 treatment

 
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From the TOC it looks like ES6 is heavily represented. Are there any ES6 (or beyond) features that you left out as they are probably not great or are underdeveloped? The ones that *are* represented - did you aim for giving ES6 justice (and describe all features) or just the ones that you recommend a ninja should master.

Does the reader need to have read the previous edition before moving on to ES6 stuff?

What's your view on compiling/transpiling JavaScript, can a modern day developer still write plain JS or it's a thing of the past?

Thanks for the Q&A!
 
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Stoyan Stefanov wrote:From the TOC it looks like ES6 is heavily represented. Are there any ES6 (or beyond) features that you left out as they are probably not great or are underdeveloped? The ones that *are* represented - did you aim for giving ES6 justice (and describe all features) or just the ones that you recommend a ninja should master.


I'm going to let Josip handle this one as he's the ninja master responsible for all of the great ES6 information in the book.

Does the reader need to have read the previous edition before moving on to ES6 stuff?


No. All of the great information in the first edition is still in the 2nd edition. There's just much more great info in the 2nd edition!

What's your view on compiling/transpiling JavaScript, can a modern day developer still write plain JS or it's a thing of the past?


This has already been discussed in a number of topics already posted, so please refer to those topics for this subject.

Thanks for the Q&A!


Always a pleasure!
 
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Hi,

The goal was to cover all non-trivial ES6 features, and we only left out a couple of small, fringe ones (e.g.  binary and octal literals, some new methods to the Math object, and Weak Sets and Weak Maps). Of the slightly "less-small" ES6 features, the only thing that didn't make it in were Symbols (a unique and immutable data type used as object properties keys).

As for ES7, it's a really small extension of JavaScript: one additional method to Arrays (includes, which we cover) and the exponential operator (which we didn't mention). At the time of writing, async/await was also in the loop for ES7, so the book includes it also (in the end it was pushed to ES8, but it is a stage 4 proposal, so it's almost certain to be in).

So to reiterate: we cover almost all of ES6, ES7, and (as it looks now) the most important feature from ES8.

Josip
 
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