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career advice for begineer

 
Greenhorn
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[size=18]Hello, this is my first post ever.

I am a newbie in computer programming and
I've been learning java by myself for 3 months (full time)  now.
(By reading books like 'Beginning Programming With Java for Dummies' and 'Java 24 hour Trainer' and a few others, also doing coding exercises from the books.) I already bought several books for beginners and intermediate.
I also learn from this site (which helps me heaps ) , youtube tutorial videos and others.

Currently, I know very little about programming and am finding an Internship (unpaid) or similar to get more understanding of java and knowledge,to meet other programmers (or a newbie like me). I'm in Perth, Australia btw.
My goal is to learn myself how to code(java) and land an entry level programmer job finally.
I am committed to this and I am not doing anything else except learning programming (Java) at the moment.

May I know that -

How long normally it takes for full time self learner to be able to work as a junior programmer?

Is an Internship a good idea? what are the requirements to be an intern?

Any advice on how to teach myself code and learn an entry level job asap[size=12]
?

Thanks in advance.
[/size][/size]
 
author & internet detective
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Welcome to CodeRanch!

Different people learn at different speeds. There isn't one answer to this.

One of the biggest problems for a self learner is how to get a first job. Even an internship is going to want to see proof you can program. Once you know how to problem, start putting code on github, volunteering, etc.
 
kyaw khing
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thanks sir, I think probably I should
(1) first learn how to code properly.
(2) involve in github and other open projects
(3) a volunteer or internship at a local IT startup or whatever.
(4) then basic entry level job like system tester, may be while learning at the same time.
(5) then a junior developer, may be ?

I am just writing down what I think is my path, not sure though , please correct me .
 
Greenhorn
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I also recommend against graduate degrees in IT. IT is a skill based trade. While I'm not going to say that this is absolute and I'm also going to say that people who used years of their lives getting the degree might argue (as it would suggest they wasted time... and no they didn't) I have never met a person in the real world who got a masters degree or above in an IT skill that benefited more from it than from product specific studies.

I would say however that if you studied computer science and electronics engineering, it will make you a much much stronger IT person. the better you understand the underlying logic and theory of computing the better you'll understand networking. It's amazing how much more sense protocols make if you can look at them and simply say "Hmm... weird.... oh I see" as opposed to "Hmmm... is it magical?". OSPF in itself I find is impossible to fully comprehend unless you understand enough about coding to recognize it that's a dirty nasty hack which is coverred with duct tape and band-aids and practically the whole world runs it
 
Ranch Hand
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Hi, Kyaw,

The best advice i can give is never stop learning and become a good coder. Everything else comes from your ability to code well. Without it, you are unfortunately not going to be very happy in software engineering. That is the essence of software engineering, the one core skill you must have.

Additionally, never lose your love for coding. That's actually fairly easy to do - it's such a fun thing.

With best regards,

Anton.

 
kyaw khing
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Thanks for the advice, Happy coding !
 
Greenhorn
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Hello kyaw khing,

Yes, Everyone take different time to learn it.

The most important thing for you is to learn coding properly.

If you want to make career in this field then it is the basic need.

I am also a Software Engineer. I also wanted to become expert in coding. later I understood that I didn't have interest in this, I was not a regular learner.

So I left that work & now preparing for ibps it officer exam.

So I just want to advice you that if you have interest in this then never leave learning. Do your best. Never leave a thing in which you are interested

Best of Luck
 
Marshal
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Welcome to the Ranch
 
kyaw khing
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Hi,

thanks for the words. I am definitely enjoying learning to code. I already finished a couple of java (basic) books.
I made a website and posted my fun coding exercises from the books.

here is the link,please have a look.  

https://sites.google.com/site/lazycoderonearth/home

I also found a good you tube java tutorial by Derek Banas.
here it is,
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=derek+banas+java

thanks for the replies and happy Xmas!

 
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