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JavaFx project in NetBeans  RSS feed

 
Martin Maus
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Dear Java experts,

I´m working on a JavaFX project, and recently switched from Eclipse to NetBeans 8.1. - When I run the project, Netbeans creates a dist folder with a jar file in it, although the native packaging option (Project -> Properties) is disabled. Furthermore (as per the output tab), Netbeans executes the jar file, although I´m only trying to run the project withing the IDE. Am I missing something here, or is this just the way NetBeans rolls?

Thank you very much for you attention,

Martin
 
John Damien Smith
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> Netbeans executes the jar file, although I´m only trying to run the project withing the IDE.  Am I missing something here, or is this just the way NetBeans rolls?

I haven't used NetBeans for Java development in a long time, but yes, by default it used to always create jar files for JavaFX projects and perhaps that hasn't changed.

> When I run the project, Netbeans creates a dist folder with a jar file in it, although the native packaging option (Project -> Properties) is disabled.

Native packaging is different from jar packaging.  Jar is a platform independent packaging option, whereas native packaging uses platform dependent formats (e.g. .rpm, .deb, .exe, .msi, .dmg, .app etc).

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Aside, I use intellij idea for JavaFX development and it seems to work fine for me.
  https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/2016.3/javafx.html
I think the ultimate edition of Intellij offers some extras over the community edition (such as autocomplete and static inspections on css files), but the basic JavaFX development flow still works with community edition.
Intellij doesn't automatically package JavaFX projects as jar files every time you build a JavaFX project.
That said, NetBeans still works fine for JavaFX development.

 
Martin Maus
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That clarifies things. - Thank you very much for your quick answer.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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